Mademoiselle Mathilde: A Novel, Volume 1

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Bradbury, Evans, 1868
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Page 177 - For he hath not despised nor abhorred the affliction of the afflicted; neither hath he hid his face from him ; but when he cried unto him, he heard.
Page 111 - Surely none of our readers are so unfortunate as not to know some man or woman who carry this atmosphere of peace and goodwill about with them. ' — HENRY KINGSLEY, Mademoiselle Mathilde (1868), vol. i. p. in. ' No action or institution can be salutary and stable which are [is] not based on reason and the will of God.
Page 191 - ... valley, among the meadows, the lanes and the fords, it was nearly as peaceful and quiet as it was aloft on the mountaintops ; and under the darkening shadows of the rapidly leafing elms, you could hear — it was so still — the cows grazing and the trout rising in the river. (Stretton.) * * * * Even in summer, when the valley below was still, peaceful and calm, some wandering wind always found its way into the hollow where the old house stood and in some way raised mournful music ; either sighing...
Page 141 - Ladies do not faint nowadays—at least but rarely. If one can trust a certain mass of evidence, oral and written, syncope at the end of the last century, and up to the thirty-fifth year of this, was a habit with ladies. A story without a swoon was impossible until lately. Let us thank heaven comfortably that our mothers, wives and daughters have given up the evil habit of becoming cataleptic at the occurrence of anything in the least surprising.
Page vii - WHEN asked to write the first story which has ever appeared in the " Gentleman's Magazine " in a course of 137 years, I was extremely diffident, feeling somewhat like a modest young curate, who has to return thanks for the clergy before a large audience principally composed of dissenters ; I was not reassured by being told, before I began, that a large number of the subscribers strongly objected to the arrangement ; and I am glad to hear that the opposition has ceased...
Page 141 - ... year of this, was a habit with ladies. A story without a swoon was impossible until lately. Let us thank heaven comfortably that our mothers, wives, and daughters, have given up the evil habit of becoming cataleptic at the occurrence of anything in the least degree surprising.
Page 191 - Even in summer, when the valley below was still, peaceful and calm, some wandering wind always found its way into the hollow where the old house stood and in some way raised mournful music ; either sighing through the dry grass of the wold ; or whispering to the scattered junipers ; or raising fitfully a lonely sound like falling water among the elms which surrounded the house. The furious south-west from Brittany, from the wild quicksands of Mont St. Michel, from the tossing-woods of Dinan, from...
Page 191 - ... valley below was still, peaceful and calm, some wandering wind always found its way into the hollow where the old house stood and in some way raised mournful music ; either sighing through the dry grass of the wold ; or whispering to the scattered junipers ; or raising fitfully a lonely sound like falling water among the elms which surrounded the house. The furious south-west from Brittany, from the wild quicksands of Mont St. Michel, from the tossing-woods of Dinan, from the desolate druid rocks...

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