Madness in the Family

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New Directions Publishing, May 1, 1990 - Fiction - 141 pages
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What a delight to find seventeen of Saroyan s uncollected stories within one cover!....charming tales, all blessed with Saroyan s pixieish imagination and magical writing style .Even today they read as though they have been freshly minted from the Saroyan treasure house. A discovery for those who love Saroyan s fiction; his spark is still wonderfully alive. Library Journal
 

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Madness in the family

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What a delight to find 17 of Saroyan's uncollected stories under one cover! To assemble these charming tales, all blessed with Saroyan's pixieish imagination and magical writing style, editor Hamalian ... Read full review

Contents

Madness in the Family
1
Fire
5
What a World Said the Bicycle Rider
9
Gaston
25
The Inscribed Copy of the Kreutzer Sonata
33
Picnic Time
45
A Fresno Fable
53
Lord Chugger of Cheer
55
Mystic Games
83
Twenty Is the Greatest Time in Any Mans Life
89
How the Barber Finally Got Himself into a Fable
99
There Was a Young Lady of Perth
101
How to Choose a Wife
113
The Last Word Was Love
123
The Duel
131
A Letter from William Saroyan to James Laughlin
143

Cowards
63
Najari Levons Old Country Advice to the Young Americans on How to Live with a Snake
75

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About the author (1990)

William Saroyan (1908–1981) was born in Fresno, California. Famous for a long and voluminous career, he wrote novels, along with some sixteen story collections, and plays including The Human Comedy (winning an Academy Award for his screenplay), and The Time of Your Life, for which he won the Drama Critics Circle and Pulitzer Prizes. He wrote about "the archetypal Armenian families who inhabit Saroyan country, in and around Fresno, California. [And yet with their] unpredictable charm and wacky spontaneity … his characters overflow with so much human comedy that they transcend all ethnic boundaries, as in the stories of I.B. Singer" (The Chicago Tribune).

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