Madrasas in South Asia: Teaching Terror?

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Jamal Malik, Professor and Chair of Religious Studies - Islamic Studies Jamal Malik
Routledge, Nov 27, 2007 - Political Science - 204 pages
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After 9/11, madrasas have been linked to international terrorism. They are suspected to foster anti-western, traditionalist or even fundamentalist views and to train al-Qaeda fighters. This has led to misconceptions on madrasa-education in general and its role in South Asia in particular. Government policies to modernize and ‘pacify’ madrasas have been precipitous and mostly inadequate.

This book discusses the educational system of madrasas in South Asia. It gives a contextual account of different facets of madrasa education from historical, anthropological, theological, political and religious studies perspectives. Some contributions offer recommendations on possible – and necessary – reforms of religious educational institutions. It also explores the roots of militancy and sectarianism in Pakistan, as well as its global context.

Overall, the book tries to correct misperceptions on the role of madrasas, by providing a more balanced discussion, which denies neither the shortcomings of religious educational institutions in South Asia nor their important contributions to mass education.

 

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Contents

1 INTRODUCTION
1
The Madrasa Manzari Islam Bareilly and Jamia Ashrafiyya Mubarakpur
23
Identity and difference in Indian madrasas
45
The potential for violence in Pakistan?
61
An empirical study of Ahmedpur East
85
6 PAKISTANS RECENT EXPERIENCE IN REFORMING ISLAMIC EDUCATION
102
7 THE GENDER OF MADRASA TEACHING
113
Nation Islam and Bangladeshi art cinema on the global stage
125
Educational ideology of the Jamaati Islami of India
142
10 IN LIEU OF A CONCLUSION
165
BIBLIOGRAPHY
168
INDEX
184
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About the author (2007)

Jamal Malik is Chair of Religious Studies - Islamic Studies at the University of Erfurt, Germany. His publications include The Colonization of Islam and Islamische Gelehrtenkultur in Nordindien. He edited Perspectives of Mutual Encounters in South Asian History 1760-1860; Muslims in Europe: From the Margin to the Centre; and co-edited Religious Pluralism in South Asia and Europe; Sufism in the West (also published by Routledge) and Religion und Medien. Vom Kultbild zum Internetritual (2007).