Madrigal's Magic Key to Spanish

Front Cover
Broadway Books, 1989 - Foreign Language Study - 496 pages
6 Reviews
Mr. Renny's paintings are so good that they almost appear real. But no one seems to pay them any attention until a strange man offers to make everything that Mr. Renny paints come to life. First there's the painting of the apple, which Mr. Renny can now eat. Then there's a huge hotdog, a new car, a cruise liner... Mr. Renny paints himself a life of luxury until his friend Rose comes to ask if she can buy one of his paintings. But he doesn't have any real paintings left! The spell must be broken and soon! A book containing subtle references to the work of Belgian surrealist Ren Magritte, the illustrations are full of clever and amusing details.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
1
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CharmedLife - LibraryThing

A very helpful book that made me realize I already knew a lot more Spanish than I thought! I'll admit that I haven't been able to finish reading it (yet), but I got a lot out of it. Read full review

Value in learning

User Review  - shoppingrn1 - Overstock.com

I have several books on learning Spanish and this book approaches learning the language from a totally unique perspective. I can see why it has been used by students for years. It presents the ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (1989)

Born near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, of immigrant Czech parents, American artist Andy Warhol studied art at the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh. He then worked as a commercial artist in New York City. In the early 1960s, Warhol became the most famous pioneer of "pop art," which used comic books, advertisements, and consumer goods as subject matter. Warhol's colorful paintings of Campbell's soup can labels, boxes of Brillo pads, and celebrity icons such as Marilyn Monroe, became among the most recognizable examples of pop art. Warhol was also a filmmaker as well as a painter and graphic artist; his more memorable films include Trash (1969) and Frankenstein (1973). His studio, called "The Factory," became infamous as a locale for eccentrics and eccentric behavior, much of it associated with the New York drug scene. It was Warhol who predicted that, "in the future, everyone will be famous for 15 minutes.

Bibliographic information