Mae Madden

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Jansen, McClurg & Company, 1875 - 192 pages
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Page 58 - At half past nine by the meet'n'-house clock,— Just the hour of the Earthquake shock! —What do you think the parson found, When he got up and stared around? The poor old chaise in a heap or mound, As if it had been to the mill and ground! You see, of course, if you're not a dunce, How it went to pieces all at once,— All at once, and nothing first,— Just as bubbles do when they burst.
Page 193 - Memories,' and it should stand side by side with that on the shelves of every lover of pure, strong thoughts, put in pure, strong words. ' Graziella
Page 181 - Tell me not of a soft-sighing lover; Such things may be had by the score : I'd rather be bride to a rover, And polish the rifle he bore.
Page 193 - Graziella" the Chicago Tribune says : " It glows with love of the beautiful in nil nature. • * * It is pure literature, a perfect story, couched in perfect words. The sentences have the rhythm and flow, the sweetness and tender fancy of the original. It is uniform with
Page 194 - German Love,' whose tender pathos lacks only the harmonies of verse to make it one of the most exquisite poems in the German language, is here reprodnced in an English costume of chaste and delicate beauty."— New York Tribune.
Page 175 - I've said good-bye to my dreams of life— the floating and waving and singing and dancing life that was like iced champagne. I'd rather have cold water, thank you, sir, for a steady drink, morning, noon and night. I'm going to be good, to read and study and grow restful I am going to grow, if I can, unselfish and sympathetic, and perhaps, who knows, wise, and any way good...
Page 194 - Sold by all booksellers, or sent by mail, postpaid, on receipt of price, by the publishers, JANSEN, McCLURG, & CO., Cor. Wabash Ave. and Madison St., Chicago. we are acquainted.
Page 59 - You had better content yourself widi the fact dial you have four proper traveling companions, and bear the disgrace of being shocked as best you may by one wild scrap of femininity who will have her own way in spite of you all
Page 194 - This is one of the most charming little books we have ever read. We know of only one other story to which we can compare it — the exquisite tale of Paul and Virginia, by Bernardin de Saint Pierre. It were difficult indeed to say which of these two little books is the more admirable.
Page 193 - ... is a poem in prose. The subject and the treatment are both eminently poetic. * * * It glows with love of the beautiful in all nature. * * * It is pure literature, a perfect story, couched in perfect words. The sentences have the rythm and flow, the sweetness and tender fancy of the original. It is uniform with

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