Magazines for the Millions: Gender and Commerce in the Ladies' Home Journal and the Saturday Evening Post, 1880-1910

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SUNY Press, 1994 - Antiques & Collectibles - 263 pages
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Argues that the two popular women's magazines were pivotal in the combining of gender and commercialism at the turn of the century, and that publishers and advertisers conspired to create both a gendered commercial discourse and a commercial gender discourse for both men and women. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.
 

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Contents

III
15
IV
29
V
59
VI
81
VII
109
VIII
127
IX
145
X
155
XI
189
XII
205
XIII
233
XIV
257
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Page 5 - can only be determined specifically, in the context of time and place. We can write the history of that process only if we recognize that “man” and “woman” are at once empty and over-flowing categories. Empty because they have no ultimate, transcendent meaning. Over-flowing because even when they appear to be fixed, they still contain within them alternative, denied, or suppressed definitions.

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About the author (1994)

Helen Damon-Moore is Adjunct Professor of Women s Studies and Education at Cornell College. She is co-author of Literacy in the United States: Readers and Reading Since 1880.

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