Maggie, a Girl of the Streets, and Other Tales of New York

Front Cover
Penguin, 2000 - Fiction - 239 pages
7 Reviews
"A powerful, severe, and harshly comic portrayal of Irish immigrant life in lower New York exactly a century ago."—Alfred Kazin. Maggie, a powerful exploration of the destructive forces that underlie urban society and human nature, produced a scandal when it was first published in 1893. This volume includes "George's Mother" and eleven other tales and sketches of New York written between 1892 and 1896.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - RussellBittner - LibraryThing

I must confess, I come to this review with a heavy heart. I’ve wanted to read Maggie: A Girl of the Streets for years — and have had this edition on my bookshelves for as long. Moreover, once I ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

Not a very good book, in my opinion. The dialect came across as ludicrous. The morality was ridiculous, but I suppose that was the point. The mother and son were probably worse morally than the daughter, but it was her state in life that destroyed her. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Stephen Cranes New York
vii
Suggestions for Further Reading
xxvii
A Note on the Texts
xxix
A Girl of the Streets A Story of New York 1893
1
Georges Mother 1896
87
Tales of New York
157
The BrokenDown Van 1892
159
An Ominous Baby 1893 1894
167
A DarkBrown Dog 1893 1901
175
An Experiment in Misery 1894
183
An Experiment in Luxury 1894
195
Mr Binks Day Off 1894
205
The Men in the Storm 1894
215
When Man Falls a Crowd Gathers 1894
223
An Eloquence of Grief 1896 1898
229
Adventures of a Novelist 1896
233

A Great Mistake 1893 1896
171

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About the author (2000)

Poet, novelist, and journalist, Stephen Crane (1871-1900) was born in Newark, New Jersey. His works include 'The Red Badge of Courage', 'The Black Riders', a volume of poetry, and the stories 'The Open Boat' and 'The Blue Hotel'. He died of tuberculosis in Badenweiler, Germany. Lazer Ziff is Professor of English at Johns Hopkins University and the editor of Emerson's Selected Essays for Penguin Classics.

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