Magic Words: The Tale of a Jewish Boy-Interpreter, the Frontier's Most Estimable Magician, a Murderous Harlot, and America's Greatest Indian Chief

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Open Road Media, May 1, 2012 - Fiction - 384 pages
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In a riveting novel of love and adventure, young Julius Meyer comes to the New World to find himself acting as translator for the famed Indian chief Standing Bear Young Jewish immigrant Julius comes of age surrounded by the wild world of 1867 Nebraska. He befriends the mysterious Prophet John, who saves his life when the two are captured by the Ponca Indian tribe. Living as a slave, Julius meets the noble chief Standing Bear and his young daughter, Prairie Flower, with whom he falls in love. Becoming the tribe’s interpreter—its “speaker”—his life seems safe and settled. But Julius has reckoned without the arrival of his older cousin, Alexander—who, as the Great Herrmann, is the most famous young magician in America. Nor does he suspect the ultimate consequences of Alex’s affair with Lady-Jane Little Feather, a glamorous—and murderous—prostitute destined to become the most scandalous woman on two continents.  Filled with adventure, humor, and colorful characters, Magic Words is a riveting adventure about the nature of prejudice, the horror of genocide, and a courageous young man who straddles two worlds to fight for love and freedom.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Jamie638 - LibraryThing

Before Houdini, the greatest magicians were probably the Herrmann brothers, Alexander and Compars (Carl) They were German Jews who divided up the "civilized world" between them (North America to ... Read full review

MAGIC WORDS

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A book that takes real historical characters, mixes magic with the winning of the West and conjures an absorbing tale.In 1867, Compars Herrmann and his brother Alexander are the two most renowned ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8
Section 23
Section 24
Section 25
Section 26
Section 27
Section 28
Section 29
Section 30

Section 9
Section 10
Section 11
Section 12
Section 13
Section 14
Section 15
Section 16
Section 17
Section 18
Section 19
Section 20
Section 21
Section 22
Section 31
Section 32
Section 33
Section 34
Section 35
Section 36
Section 37
Section 38
Section 39
Section 40
Section 41
Section 42
Section 43
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Gerald Kolpan, author of Etta (2009), previously was a contributor to NPR’s All Things Considered and for twenty years was the Emmy award–winning features reporter for Philly’s WXTF-TV. He lives in Philadelphia.

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