Magna Carta: And Other Addresses

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Columbia University Press, 1916 - Constitutional law - 282 pages
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This volume includes discussions on such topics as the Magna Carta, the Mayflower Compact, constitutional morality, the Eleventh Amendment, criticism of the courts and the duties of citizenship.
 

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Page 73 - ... are powers limited and to what purpose is that limitation committed to writing, if these limits may at any time be passed by those intended to be restrained ? The distinction between a government with limited and unlimited powers is abolished if those limits do not confine the persons on whom they are imposed and if acts prohibited and acts allowed are of equal obligation.
Page 243 - Judges of the Court of Appeals and justices of the Supreme Court, may be removed by concurrent resolution of both houses of the Legislature, if two-thirds of all the members elected to each house concur therein.
Page 124 - The very essence of civil liberty certainly consists in the right of every individual to claim the protection of the laws, whenever he receives an injury.
Page 31 - Virginia, doe by these presents solemnly & mutualy in ye presence of God, and one of another, covenant & combine our selves togeather into a civill body politick, for our better ordering & preservation & furtherance of ye ends aforesaid; and by vertue hearof to enacte, constitute, and frame such just & equall lawes, ordinances, acts, constitutions, & offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meete & convenient for ye generall good of ye Colonie, unto which we promise all due submission...
Page 71 - The interpretation of the laws is the proper and peculiar province of the courts. A constitution is, in fact, and must be regarded by the judges as, a fundamental law.
Page 38 - The experience that was had in this commone course and condition, tried sundrie years, and that amongst godly and sober men, may well evince the vanitie of that conceite of Platos...
Page 114 - It may, we think, be laid down as a rule which admits of no exception, that, in all cases where jurisdiction depends on the party, it is the party named in the record.
Page 15 - To no one will we sell, to no one will we refuse or delay, right or justice.
Page 24 - ... who shall take care with all their might, to hold and observe, and cause to be observed, the peace and liberties we have granted them, and by this our present Charter...
Page 129 - No man is desirous of placing himself in a disagreeable situation. No man is desirous of becoming the peculiar subject of calumny. No man, might he let the bitter cup pass from him without self-reproach, would drain it to the bottom. But if he has no choice in the case ; if there...

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