Magnet and Specialized Schools of the Future: A Focus on Change

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R&L Education, 2005 - Education - 228 pages
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The five volumes in the Schools of the Future set are uniquely valuable, comprehensive resources for all the stakeholders involved in a public school construction project, whether a new building, addition, or renovation. Each of these books-The Elementary School of the Future, The Middle School of the Future, The High School of the Future, Magnet and Specialized Schools of the Future and the forthcoming The Community College of the Future-brings together essential information on every stage of the process of creating a new public educational facility. Unlike other books on school design, which are geared toward architects and engineers, the Schools of the Future books have been created especially for boards of education, school building committees, district superintendents, and other decision makers, offering them essential guidance on: ensuring that schools built today serve tomorrow's educational needs, using technological advances to control burgeoning square-footages, accommodating community groups and other after-hours users of school facilities, mounting effective campaigns to pass school-bond referenda, planning, designing, and managing school construction projects collaboratively. This volume features case studies of recent exemplary magnet and specialized school construction projects, and provides a detailed educational specification that's genuinely future-oriented. Sustained attention is given to numerous issues influencing contemporary public school design including: the need to protect indoor environmental quality, the mandate to accommodate special-needs students, the desirability of sustainable design, the need for good acoustical design, and many other topics. Additional features for this book: provides guidance on both developing an interdistrict and intradistrict magnet school, assists districts in writing grants to sustain the program over time when district shortfalls may reduce funding, presents selected schools from throughout the country tha
 

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Contents

School Choice and the Planning and Design of Specialized Schools
3
Specialized Schools Twelve Exemplary Projects
9
An Arts Magnet Elementary School
15
A Magnet Elementary Housed in an Existing School Building
20
Magnets for Children of Working Parents
25
A Montessori Magnet Elementary School
33
A Shared Facility for High School Magnet Programs
41
A PurposeBuilt TechnologyThemed Magnet High School
51
Special Ed Thats Even More Special Designing Schools for Autistic Students
99
Design Considerations for Specialized Schools
107
A Draft Magnet School Operations Plan
137
Issues in SpecializedSchool Planning Design and Construction
147
School Technology A Sensible FutureOriented Approach
149
Site Design and Landscape Architecture for Urban Magnet Schools
171
Improving School Acoustics A Systems Approach
179
Indoor Air Quality Problems and Solutions
189

A DesignThemed Charter High School
57
A Magnet School Within a School
62
A VoTech High School on a Community College Campus
65
A Rooftop Addition to a Specialized Urban High School
70
Creating Magnet Charter and Other Specialized Schools
75
Planning Creating and Funding New Magnet Schools
77
Preparing Students for the Future World of Work
85
Finding a Home The Facilities Side of the Charter School Debate
93
A Sustainable Approach to SpecializedSchool Design
195
OneStop Shopping? The Perils and Promise of DesignBuild Project Delivery
199
The Future of Magnet Schools
209
Educational Technology Standards
213
References
215
Index
217
About the Authors and Contributors
224
Copyright

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Page 216 - Visher, Mary G., Peter Teitelbaum, and David Emanuel. 1999. Key High School Reform Strategies: An Overview of Research Findings.

About the author (2005)

Edwin T. Merritt has supervised many school construction projects as superintendent of public school districts in Connecticut and Pennsylvania. Now Fletcher-Thompson, Inc.'s director of Educational Planning and Research, Merritt has written extensively on future-oriented school planning and design and is the recipient of numerous awards. James A. Beaudin has participated in the design of more than 100 schools in nearly 50 communities as the principal of Fletcher-Thompson, Inc.'s Education Practice Group. Under his direction, the Education Practice Group has created more than 7.5 million square feet of educational space. Charles R. Cassidy is director of planning specialized educational facilities for Fletcher-Thompson, Inc. Patricia A. Myler is director of pre-K-12 facilities and a senior associate at Fletcher-Thompson, Inc.

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