Magnetic Fields of Force: An Exposition of the Phenomena of Magnetism, Electro-magnetism, and Induction Based on the Conception of Lines of Force, Part 1

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1897 - Electromagnetism - 297 pages
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Contents

Natural magnets fitted with polepieces
15
The keeper
16
Communication of magnetic properties to steel
17
Production of artificial magnets
18
Immaterial nature of magnetism
20
Compound magnets
23
Magnets of special forms
24
The horseshoe magnet
25
Magnets with one degree of freedom
29
B Mechanical action between two movable magnets
39
CHAPTER III
54
B Magnetism as an extraterrestrial influence
72
Magnetic theory of the suns corona
73
Influence of the moon on terrestrial magnetism
74
CHAPTER IV
76
Comparison of magnetic force with the force of gravitational attraction
78
the dyne
79
Measurement of magnetic attractions in dynes by means of the balance
80
Dimensions of physical quantities dimensions of force
81
The Newtonian law of universal attraction
82
Strength of pole
83
Unit strength of pole
85
Dimensions of strength of pole
86
Determination of strength of pole in absolute measure
87
Conception and measurement of strength of field
88
Mechanical force exerted upon a pole of determinate strength by a field of given intensity
89
Dimensions of fieldintensity
90
Number of lines of force proceeding from a pole of given strength
91
Deflection of a declination needle by a bar magnet
92
Couples acting upon a magnetic needle in a uniform field
93
Comparison of fieldintensities by the method of oscillations
94
Quantities which determine the period of oscillation of a needle
95
Determination of fieldintensities in absolute measure by oscillations
96
Determination of magnetic moments in absolute measure by oscillations 9 Determination of the horizontal component of the earths 2 magnetic ...
97
THE REPRESENTATION OF FIELDS OF FORCE
99
Tubes of force
100
Flux of force
101
Law of the conservation of the flux of force
102
Maxwells unit solenoids
103
Diagram of a unipolar field
104
Estimation of fieldintensity from the diagram
105
Diagram of a bipolar magnetic field
106
88 Combination of two fluxofforce diagrams
108
Evaluation of the fieldintensity at any point of a bipolar magnetic field by means of the diagram
110
Diagrams of homogeneous fields
113
Combination of more than two fields
115
CHAPTER WI CONSTITUTION OF MAGNETS AND MAGNETIC FIELDS
116
Chains of molecular magnets
117
Model of a bar magnet composed of molecular magnets
118
The toroid or anchorring
119
The divided toroid
120
Dimensions of magnetisation
121
Magnetic screening
123
Screening of a magnetic needle by soft iron
125
Conception of magnetic polarisation
127
Paramagnetic and diamagnetic substances
128
Flux of magnetic induction
130
Dimensions of the magnetic induction
131
Tubes of induction and flux of induction
132
Susceptibility
133
Axial character of the magnetic lines of force
144
Rotational vectors
145
Principle of the superposition of small motions
146
Conception of a permanent motion
147
B Mechanical interpretation of the dynamical properties of magnetic lines of force
150
Explanation of the mechanical forces due to magnets in accordance with the hypothesis of permanent motions
152
Kinematic representation of tubes of force
154
Dynamical models of several important forms of magnets
155
Experiments on vortex motion
157
Generation of vortices in water
158
Vortex lines in the vortex filaments
159
Direction of the vortex lines
160
Strength of a vortex
161
Experiments with smoke rings
162
Cyclic motions
164
Cyclic coordinates and cyclic velocities
166
Energy of cyclic systems the cyclic moment
167
Forces corresponding to cyclic coordinates
168
Extension of the conception of a cycle
169
Imperfect cycles
173
Monocycles dicycles and polycycles
174
Slowly varying parameters
175
CHAPTER VIII
180
B Circular currents
191
Conception of a current
197
Differences between the fields of magnets and of galvanic currents
203
B Quantitative relations
216
The characteristic magnitude for the field of a current con ception of currentstrength
221
Dimensions of currentstrength 22
224
Measure of a current in absolute units the unit of current strength the ampère
225
The tangent galvanometer
227
Work of electromagnetic forces
228
Energy of the field of a currentloop
231
The field of a current as a monocyclic mechanism
232
Electromagnetic fluxofforce diagrams
233
Graphic representation of the system of lines of force due to a rectilinear current
234
_173 Deduction of the fieldintensity at any point of an axially symmetrical field from the diagram
236
CHAPTER X
240
Multipliers
242
Galvanometer
243
Solenoids
244
Equivalence of solenoids and bar magnets
246
Bobbins
248
Magnetic effects of bobbins
250
Spring ampèremeter
253
Uniform field within a helix
254
Magnetising helix
255
The electromagnet
256
Some applications of electromagnets
258
CHAPTER XI
261
The lefthand rule
264
Mechanical interpretation of the dynamical forces
266
Electromagnetic rotations
268
Magnetoelectric motor
270
Rotation of radial currents
273
Movements of a flexible conductor in the field of a bar magnet
274
A94 Quantitative law of the mechanical action upon a movable currentconductor in a stationary magnetic field
276
A Electrodynamic action between two different currentconductors
280
Action of different parts of the same currentconductor upon
287

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