Mahabharata

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Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 2000 - Hindu mythology - 417 pages
4 Reviews
The Mahabharata is an Indian epic, in its original Sanskrit probably the largest ever composed. It is the story of a dynastic struggle that provides a social, moral, and cosmological background to the climatic battle. The present English rendition is a retelling based on a translation of the Sanskrit original published by Pratap Chandra Roy, Published in the beginning of this century. William buck has condensed the story. The old translation from which he worked covers 5800 pages of print, while his own book is less than a tenth of that length. But by and large, Buck`s rendition reflects the sequence of events in the Sanskrit epic, and he uses the traditional techniques for instance, of stories within stories, flashbacks, moral lessons laid in the mouths of principal characters. There are other English versions of the Mahabharata, some shorter, some longer. But apart from William Buck`s rendition, none have been able to capture the blend of religion andmartial spirit that pervades the original epic. It succeeds eminently in illustrating how seemingly grand and magnificent human endeavors turn out to be astoundingly insignificant in the perspective of eternity. CONTENTS Publisher's Preface, Introduction, Part I: In the Beginning, A Mine of Jewels and Gems, The Ring and the Well, Fire and Flame, Indraprastha, The Falling Sand, Part II: In the Middle, 6:00 Nala and Damayanti, 7:00 The Thousand-Petaled Lotus, An Iron Net, Virata, The Invasion, Do Not Tell, Sanjaya Returns, Trees of Gold, The Enchanted Lake, The Night, Part III: In the End, The Blade of Grass, The Lonely Encounter, Parikshita, The Timeless Path, The City of Gates, Notes, Reference List of Characters
 

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User Review  - ashishg - LibraryThing

Mahabharata is the one of the most important, interesting and influential mythology/story in the whole world. C Rajagopalachari does a great job of translating this epic poem into English making it ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bethlakshmi - LibraryThing

A nice sized paperback, probably fairly accurate, though certainly trimmed. I personally don't care for Buck much, I find his translations a little bit dry and in an archiac style. It's probably quite accurate, but it's just not fun for me to read. Read full review

Contents

I
xiii
II
1
III
5
IV
27
V
51
VI
73
VII
95
VIII
115
XIV
235
XV
249
XVI
265
XVII
285
XVIII
309
XIX
329
XX
333
XXI
353

IX
119
X
141
XI
167
XII
193
XIII
215
XXII
373
XXIII
389
XXIV
401
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Page v - For like as winter rasure doth alway arase and deface green summer, so fareth it by unstable love in man and woman. For in many persons there is no stability ; for we may see all day, for a little blast of winter's rasure, anon we shall deface and lay apart true love for little or nought...
Page v - For then all herbs and trees renew a man and woman, and in likewise lovers call again to their mind old gentleness and old service, and many kind deeds that were forgotten by negligence.
Page v - ... and deface green summer, so fareth it by unstable love in man and woman. For in many persons there is no stability ; for we may see all day, for a little blast of winter's rasure, anon we shall deface and lay apart true love for little or nought, that cost much thing; this is no wisdom nor stability, but it is feebleness of nature and great disworship, whomsoever useth this.
Page xii - My motive is therefore that of the storyteller. I'm not trying to prove anything and I have made my own changes to tell the story better. Here are two great stories just waiting for people to read them. Based on the words of ancient songs, I have written books. I tried to make them interesting to read. I don't think you will find many other books like them.
Page xi - His great goal was to tell the tales in such a way that the modern reader would not be discouraged from knowing and loving the stories as he did. He wanted to convey the spirit, the truth, of the epics. In answer to a critic of his manuscripts he replied...

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About the author (2000)

William Buck died in 1970 at the age of 37 after more than 15 years of work on the "Ramayana, Mahabharata, " and the unfinished "Harivamsa." Of the two finished books, he wrote, "My method in writing both Mahabharata and Ramayana was to begin with a literal translation from which to extract the story, and then to tell that story in an interesting way that would preserve the spirit and flavor of the original.

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