Main Street: The Story of Carol Kennicott

Front Cover
Grosset & Dunlap, 1920 - City and town life - 451 pages
23 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
11
3 stars
7
2 stars
1
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lkernagh - LibraryThing

I am so glad I listened to the audiobook as read by Lloyd James and didn't attempt to read a print copy. I think reading it would have been the perfect cure if I was suffering from insomnia. The story ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nittnut - LibraryThing

Carol grows up in a rather intellectual home, but without a mother. She attends college and takes a job as a librarian in St. Paul. After a time, she meets Dr. Will Kennicott. They marry and go to ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
12
III
20
IV
31
V
54
VI
68
VII
81
VIII
93
XXI
250
XXII
262
XXIII
274
XXIV
287
XXV
306
XXVI
316
XXVII
323
XXVIII
326

IX
99
X
109
XI
124
XII
145
XIII
154
XIV
161
XV
176
XVI
195
XVII
205
XVIII
217
XIX
230
XX
240
XXIX
341
XXX
356
XXXI
368
XXXII
377
XXXIII
390
XXXIV
404
XXXV
411
XXXVI
418
XXXVII
425
XXXVIII
431
XXXIX
444

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 264 - Waal I swan." This altogether admirable tradition rules the vaudeville stage, facetious illustrators, and syndicated newspaper humor, but out of actual life it passed forty years ago. Carol's small town thinks not in hoss-swapping but in cheap motor cars, telephones, ready-made clothes, silos, alfalfa, kodaks, phonographs, leather-upholstered Morris chairs, bridge-prizes, oilstocks, motion-pictures, land-deals, unread sets of Mark Twain, and a chaste version of national politics.
Page 36 - ... reposing on a sun-faded crepe blouse. Sam Clark's Hardware Store. An air of frankly metallic enterprise. Guns and churns and barrels of nails and beautiful shiny butcher knives. Chester Dashaway's House Furnishing Emporium. A vista of heavy oak rockers with leather seats, asleep in a dismal row. Billy's Lunch. Thick handleless cups on the wet oilcloth-covered counter. An odor of onions and the smoke of hot lard. In the doorway a young man audibly sucking a tooth-pick. The warehouse of the buyer...
Page 35 - Rowland & Gould's Grocery. In the display window, black, overripe bananas and lettuce on which a cat was sleeping. Shelves lined with red crepe paper which was now faded and torn and concentrically spotted. Flat against the wall of the second story the signs of the lodges— the Knights of Pythias, the Maccabees, the Woodmen, the Masons.
Page 267 - Prairie regards itself as a part of the Great World, compares itself to Rome and Vienna, it will not acquire the scientific spirit, the international mind, which would make it great. It picks at information which will visibly procure money or social distinction. Its conception of a community ideal is not the grand manner, the noble aspiration, the fine aristocratic pride, but cheap labor for the kitchen and rapid increase in the price of land. It plays at cards on greasy oilcloth in a shanty, and...
Page 35 - The Rosebud Movie Palace." Lithographs announcing a film called "Fatty in Love." Howland & Gould's Grocery. In the display window, black, overripe bananas and lettuce on which a cat was sleeping. Shelves lined with red crepe paper which was now faded and torn and concentrically spotted.
Page 34 - She trailed down the street on one side, back on the other, glancing into the cross streets. It was a private Seeing Main Street tour. She was within ten minutes beholding not only the heart of a place called Gopher Prairie, but ten thousand towns from Albany to San Diego: Dyer's Drug Store, a corner building of regular and unreal blocks of artificial stone. Inside the store, a greasy marble soda-fountain with an electric lamp of red and green and curdled-yellow mosaic shade.
Page 264 - The other tradition is that the significant features of all villages are whiskers, iron dogs upon lawns, gold bricks, checkers, jars of gilded cattails, and shrewd comic old men who are known as "hicks" and who ejaculate "Waal I swan.
Page 265 - It is contentment . . . the contentment of the quiet dead, who are scornful of the living for their restless walking. It is negation canonized as the one positive virtue. It is the prohibition of happiness. It is slavery self-sought and self-defended. It is dullness made God.

Bibliographic information