Main street

Front Cover
New American Library, 1920 - Fiction - 439 pages
27 Reviews
"This is America-a town of a few thousand, in a region of wheat and corn and dairies and little groves." So Sinclair Lewis-recipient of the Nobel Prize and rejecter of the Pulitzer-prefaces his novel Main Street. Lewis is brutal in his depictions of the self-satisfied inhabitants of small-town America, a place which proves to be merely an assemblage of pretty surfaces, strung together and ultimately empty.

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User Review  - ffortsa - LibraryThing

I couldn't tell sometimes if this story of early 20th century small town morals and social pressures was feminist or mocking. Carol, a young woman who has lost her parents, becomes a librarian in St ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LauGal - LibraryThing

This is a well written story of life in a simpler time,but not simple life! A good,digestable read. A good choice if you never read Lewis before. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
6
Section 2
7
Section 3
17
Copyright

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About the author (1920)

Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951), was born in Sauk Centre, Minne-sota, and graduated from Yale in 1907; in 1930 he became the first American recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature. Main Street (1920) was his first critical and commercial success. Lewis's other noted books include Babbitt (1922), Arrowsmith (1925), Elmer Gantry (1927), Dodsworth (1929), and It Can't Happen Here (1935).

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