Major James Rennell and the Rise of Modern English Geography

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Cassell & Company, 1895 - Geographers - 232 pages
 

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Page 128 - The air was sweet and plaintive, and the words, literally translated, were these. "The winds roared, and the rains fell. The poor white man, faint and weary, came and sat under our tree. He has no mother to bring him milk; no wife to grind his corn.
Page 146 - Now, if bits of cork, or chaff, or any floating substance, be put into a basin, and a circular motion be given to the water, all the light substances will be found crowding together near the centre of the pool, where there is the least motion. Just such a basin is the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf Stream, and the Sargasso Sea is the centre of the whirl.
Page 106 - And he gave it for his opinion, " that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of ground, where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to hist country, than the whole race of politicians put together.
Page 170 - And when he went forth to land, there met him out of the city a certain man, which had devils long time, and ware no clothes, neither abode in any house, but in the tombs.
Page 127 - The berries are much esteemed by the natives, who convert them into a sort of bread, by exposing them for some days to the sun, and afterwards pounding them gently in a wooden mortar until the farinaceous part of the berry is separated from the stone. This meal is then mixed with a little water and formed into cakes, which, when dried in the sun, resemble in colour and flavour the sweetest gingerbread. The...
Page 106 - And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.
Page 128 - I was anxiously looking around for the river, one of them called out, geo affili (see the water), and looking forwards, I saw with infinite pleasure the great object of my mission — the long sought for majestic Niger, glittering to the morning sun, as broad as the Thames at Westminster, and flowing slowly to the eastward.
Page 170 - Because that he had been often bound with fetters and chains, and the chains had been plucked asunder by him. and the fetters broken in pieces: neither could any man tame him. 5 And always, night and day. he was in the mountains, and in the tombs, crying, and cutting himself with stones.
Page 121 - Before I had learned from the note the name and business of my visitor, I was struck with the manliness of his person, the breadth of his chest, the openness of his countenance, and the inquietude of his eye.
Page 151 - As water, therefore, he observes, when pent up so that it cannot escape, acquires a higher level, so, in a place where it can escape, the same operation produces a current ; and this current will extend to a greater or less distance, according to the force by which it is produced.

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