Make a PACT for Success: Designing Effective Information Presentations

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Scarecrow Press, 2002 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 241 pages
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At one time taking a public speaking course was sufficient to provide the skills necessary for effective presentations. Now, the Information Age makes the use of information technology mandatory, so that presentations are delivered not only through speech, but also using electronic communications, audio and video media, print materials. To succeed in today's world, individuals must understand the characteristics of information, as well as people's information needs, not just how to present information. Small and Arnone have developed an extraordinarily successful model for professionals and academics the PACT model (Purpose, Audience, Content, and Technique), which makes it easy to focus on the research, selection, organization, and delivery of information. Whether the assignment is public speaking, technical writing, or web designing, the PACT model can be used to integrate the common principles of information science and communication theory. This book introduces the reader to three crucial models for the successful design, development, delivery, and evaluation of information presentations. An ideal tool for professionals, a valuable ally for communications instructors, and a necessary resource for college students."

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Contents

Getting Started
1
P Is for Purpose
13
A Is for Audience
31
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

\Dr. Ruth V. Small is Associate Professor and Director of the School Media Program in the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University. She has authored over 70 publications, including three books with Marilyn P. Arnone.
Dr. Marilyn P. Arnone is President, Research and Development, and co-founder of Creative Media Solutions, Inc. with offices in Syracuse, NY and Philadelphia, PA. She has published in leading journals in her field, presented at conferences nationwide, and teaches courses and seminars as an adjunct professor at Syracuse University.

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