Make No Law: The Sullivan Case and the First Amendment

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Vintage Books, 1991 - Law - 356 pages
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The First Amendment puts it this way: "Congress shall make no law...abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press." Yet, in 1960, a city official in Montgomery, Alabama, sued The New York Times for libel -- and was awarded $500,000 by a local jury -- because the paper had published an ad critical of Montgomery's brutal response to civil rights protests. The centuries of legal precedent behind the Sullivan case and the U.S. Supreme Court's historic reversal of the original verdict are expertly chronicled in this gripping and wonderfully readable book by the Pulitzer Prize -- winning legal journalist Anthony Lewis. It is our best account yet of a case that redefined what newspapers -- and ordinary citizens -- can print or say.

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Wonderful and very readable book about the Freedom of Press in USA from Bill of Rights to Supreme Court judgement in Sullivan Case vs NY Times Read full review

Contents

Heed Their Rising Voices
5
Reaction in Montgomery
9
Separate and Unequal
15
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Anthony Lewis is the author of Make No Law and the bestseller Gideon's Trumpet. In his nearly five decades of writing and reporting for The New York Times, he served as the Time's London bureau chief for eight years; he now contributes the twice-weekly "Abroad at Home" column to the paper's op-ed page.

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