Making Creativity Accountable: How Successful Advertisers Manage Their Television and Print

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1991 - Business & Economics - 186 pages
0 Reviews

A comprehensive handbook for advertising and marketing managers, this volume shows how advertisers can effectively control agency costs without sacrificing creativity. Ron Harding profiles companies that have effectively enforced accountability on their agencies and demonstrates proven internal systems for controlling the advertising process--and its associated costs--from the initial spending plan through the final examination of actual expenditures. He also offers a pragmatic discussion of the procedures, timetables, and contracts managers need to put in place to ensure that all sectors of the agency--account, creative, legal, production, and business affairs--act in the best interest of their client and at the highest levels of their capability. All major categories of spending receive thorough coverage: television, print, talent, and media.

After an introduction which highlights the problems of runaway costs and mismanagement that plague many advertisers today, Harding presents a step-by-step guide to controlling advertising expenditures. Among the topics addressed are: how to create realistic spending plans and make them strict buying guides for the agency; how to spot successful advertising; how to make creative groups accountable; how to run a successful copy meeting; how to stop cost overruns in television and print; and how to streamline and strengthen the brand management system. Harding fully reviews how to cut costs at each stage--from the project initiation form, through copy and storyboards, to editing and final production. Written in clear, conversational style, the book focuses throughout on a pragmatic approach to advertising management while recognizing the central importance of creativity. In fact, Harding argues, by understanding the creative-cost equation and how to manipulate its variables, advertisers will necessarily reap the benefits of better advertising.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Clarifying Advertising Purpose and Costs
1
Developing a CreativityCost Equation
9
Enlisting Agency Support
13
What Should a Commercial Cost?
19
Turning Knowledge into Action The Spending Plan
23
Controlling Time The Project Initiation Form
31
Copy and Cost Success
37
Cutting the Costs of Test Commercials
43
The AICP Form
101
Cutting Costs of the Individual Commercial
111
Ensuring a Successful Shooting The PreProduction Meeting
117
Managing a CostEffective Shooting
125
Editing Disciplines and Cost Control
131
Final Costs Actual versus Estimated
135
Creative Production and Cost Controls in Print
139
Some Final Thoughts
149

Cutting Costs at the Storyboard Stage
49
The Roles of the Writer Art Director and Producer
55
Moving into the Production Process
61
Setting the PreProduction Agenda
65
Cutting Costs at the Specifications Stage
71
Buying Options Firm Bid and Cost Plus Fixed Fee
77
Overscale Talent and Print Models
81
AICP Videotape Production Cost Summary
152
AICP Glossary
161
AICE PostProduction Cost Summary
167
AICE Glossary
170
The ThreeLegged Stool An Advertiser Looks at Cost Control
177
Index
183
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1991)

RON HARDING is President of Harding & Company, a consulting firm specializing in advertising and communications. He was Director of Advertising Production for Gillette for thirteen years and Production Supervisor at Procter & Gamble for nine years. His articles have appeared in Advertising Age, Backstage, and Business Week.

Bibliographic information