Making Our Democracy Work: A Judge's View

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Sep 13, 2011 - Political Science - 288 pages
4 Reviews
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Charged with the responsibility of interpreting the Constitution, the Supreme Court has the awesome power to strike down laws enacted by our elected representatives. Why does the public accept the Court’s decisions as legitimate and follow them, even when those decisions are highly unpopular? What must the Court do to maintain the public’s faith? How can it help make our democracy work?
 
In this groundbreaking book, Justice Stephen Breyer tackles these questions and more, offering an original approach to interpreting the Constitution that judges, lawyers, and scholars will look to for many years to come.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - aevaughn - LibraryThing

Excellent overview of some of the court cases of the past and how the court interacts with the public and the other two branches of the government. It's also interesting to consider this book beside ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dono421846 - LibraryThing

Reviews of cases are the book's strong points. Part II, which is light on that element, focusing more on civics discussion, is a bit tedious. The author could have been a bit more forthcoming about ... Read full review

Contents

The Peoples Trust
1
Marbury v Madison
12
Three The Cherokees
22
Decisions That Work
73
Eight Congress Statutes and Purposes
88
Nine The Executive Branch Administrative Action
106
Specialization
137
Stability
149
Permanent Values
159
Appendix A Images
221
The Court
228
Notes
235
Index
255
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Stephen Breyer is an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. He is a resident of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Washington, D.C.

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