Making Saints: How The Catholic Church Determines Who Becomes A Saint, Who Doesn'T, And Why

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Simon and Schuster, Jul 23, 1996 - Religion - 462 pages
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From inside the Vatican, the book that became a modern classic on sainthood in the Catholic Church.
Working from church documents, Kenneth Woodward shows how saint-makers decide who is worthy of the church's highest honor. He describes the investigations into lives of candidates, explains how claims for miracles are approved or rejected, and reveals the role politics -- papal and secular -- plays in the ultimate decision. From his examination of such controversial candidates as Archbishop Oscar Romero of El Salvador and Edith Stein, a Jewish philosopher who became a nun and was gassed at Auschwitz, to his insights into the changes Pope John Paul II has instituted, Woodward opens the door on a 2,000-year-old tradition.
 

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Making saints: how the Catholic Church determines who becomes a saint, who doesn't, and why

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The Vatican allowed Woodward, a veteran Vatican observer and Newsweek journalist, unprecedented access to the persons and documentation involved in canonization. He traces the evolution of the process ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
3
Introduction
15
1
31
Saints Their Cults
50
3
113
4
119
The Witness of Martyrs
127
5
150
Heroic Virtue
221
8
251
9
280
10
290
12
353
The Future of Sainthood
374
Notes
424
Selected Bibliography
431

Mystics Visionaries
156
The Science of Miracles and
191

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About the author (1996)

Kenneth L. Woodward, a senior writer at Newsweek, has been the magazine's religion editor for thirty-two years. He lives in Westchester County, New York.

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