Making Sense Of AIDS: Culture, Sexuality, and Power in Melanesia

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University of Hawaii Press, 2008 - Health & Fitness - 320 pages
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In Melanesia, rates of HIV infection are among the highest in the Pacific and increasing rapidly, with grave humanitarian, development, and political implications. There is a great need for social research on HIV/AIDS in the region to provide better insights into the sensitive issues surrounding HIV transmission. This collection, the first book on HIV and AIDS in the Pacific region, gathers together stunning and original accounts of the often surprising ways that people make sense of the AIDS epidemic in various parts of Melanesia. The volume addresses substantive issues concerning AIDS and contemporary sexualities, relations of power, and moralities - themes that provide a powerful backdrop for twenty-first century understandings of the tensions between sexuality, religion, and politics in many parts of the world.
 

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Contents

IV
1
V
24
VI
41
VII
60
VIII
80
IX
97
X
116
XI
133
XIV
187
XV
206
XVI
224
XVII
246
XVIII
267
XIX
279
XX
307
XXI
309

XII
150
XIII
168

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About the author (2008)

Leslie Butt is associate professor in the Department of Pacific and Asian Studies at the University of Victoria, Canada.

Nicholas Thomas is Director of the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research at the Australian National University. His books include In Oceania: Visions, Artifacts, Histories, also published by Duke University Press. Richard Eves is an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow, also at the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research at the Australian National University. He is the author of The Magical Body: Power, Fame, and Meaning in a Melanesian Society.

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