Making a Living in Your Local Music Market: Realizing Your Marketing Potential

Front Cover
Hal Leonard Corporation, 1999 - Music - 304 pages
2 Reviews
You can survive happily as a musician, composer and songwriter in your own local music market! The newly revised and expanded edition of this book will show you how. It includes detailed analysis of the latest regional music scenes that have developed; an extensive new section (written by Ron Sobel - vice president of ASCAP in Los Angeles) on opportunities for musicians and composers in developing and selling music in new mediums including the Internet, Greenhouse Channels, Theme Parks, and Desk Top Films; info on how music distribution and retailing is changing to meet the challenges of the 21st century; and many more essential tips. Also features a new appendix and a helpful Resources section after each chapter.
 

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User Review  - chriszodrow - LibraryThing

A good primer. Gave me some good ideas about strategies and tactics for local work. Sobering questions and helpful hints. Interesting brief histories on local music scenes. A bit behind the times in ... Read full review

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Contents

Can a Musician Make a Living outside the Major Music Centers?
1
Finding the Right Place
4
Tips for Composers Songwriters
8
Financing and Marketing CDs and Tapes
10
CDs Vs Cassettes
12
Dealbreakers
13
Other Opportunities in Local Markets
15
CHAPTER 1 RESOURCES
16
Music Business Attorneys
156
Going But Coming Back
157
Money Isnt Everything
158
Living outside the Mainstream
159
Developing Local and Regional Music Scenes
161
Playing Music PartTime
162
The Life of the Symphony Player
165
Specialized Performing Groups
166

Getting It Together Developing Your Talent
18
Getting the Group Together
21
Starting a Band
22
Equipment
26
CHAPTER 2 RESOURCES
32
Taking It to the Street Packaging Your Talent for Potential Buyers
34
Making DemosAudio Tapes
35
Making Video Demos
37
Stylists
39
Publicists
40
CHAPTER 3 RESOURCES
47
Selling Your Act in Places You Never Dreamed Of
48
Setting a Price
49
The Alan Remington Pricing Formula
50
Booking Agents
51
Personal Managers
55
Business Managers
56
Other Creative Opportunities
57
Other Sources of Employment
58
Artist in Residence Programs
59
CHAPTER 4 RESOURCES
67
Developing Versatility
68
Teaching
70
Private Teaching
71
Sample Pieces at Medium Skill Levels
74
CHAPTER 5 RESOURCES
76
Making Use of the Union and Other Organizations
77
Radio and Television Commercials
79
The Musicians Union As a Source of Work
81
Making Contacts through the Union
83
Arts Councils and Grants
90
Specialized Casual Work
92
CHAPTER 6 RESOURCES Unions
93
Expanding Your Recording Opportunities and Developing Skills
94
Jingles
96
Hiring a Sales Representative
101
Final Thoughts on Advertising Fibu
103
CHAPTER 7 RESOURCES
104
Working in Multiple Contexts
105
Working for The Door
107
Contracts
108
Leaders and Side Musicians
109
CHAPTER 8 RESOURCES
110
Producing and Marketing Your Own Record
111
Singles
114
Finding a Producer and an Engineer
115
Cassettes Compact Discs and Vinyl
117
Budgets
118
Financing Your Project
120
Hard Disc Recording MIDI
122
Promoting and Selling Your Album
123
Publishing and Performance Rights
129
Polishing Your Skills
130
Studying Music
131
Sightreading
132
Songwriters Organizations
133
Improving Your Skills As a Songwriter
135
CHAPTER 10 RESOURCES
137
Making Inroads on the National and Regional Scene
138
Regional Geography
139
Making National Contacts As a Songwriter
140
How to Access Artists from Your Home
141
Making Publishing Contacts by Mail
143
Contacting Music Publishers in Person
144
Demos
145
Tip Sheets
146
Accessing the Major Songwriters Organizations
147
Music Print Publishers
148
Summer Music Festivals
149
CHAPTER 11 RESOURCES
150
The Urge for Going Staying or Leaving
151
Personal Managers with National Clout
153
Finding a Manager
154
Agents
155
Songwriting
167
Technology the Composer and the Schools
168
Musical Literacy
169
CHAPTER 13 RESOURCES
170
The History and Development of Regional Music Markets
171
The Philly Sound
172
New Orleans
173
Memphis and Points South
174
Miami
176
San Francisco and the Bay Area
177
Boston
179
Minneapolis
182
Chicago
184
Portland Oregon
185
Other Scenes
186
Local Markets Ebb and Flow
187
CHAPTER 14 RESOURCES
191
Seattle Denver A Tale of Two Cities
192
Recording Studios
194
Live Music
195
General Ambiance
196
CHAPTER 15 RESOURCES
200
The Music Business in Canada
201
Staying or Going
202
Govemment Aid
204
FACTOR Awards
205
The Canadian Record Market
206
Festivals
207
CHAPTER 16 RESOURCES
208
Songwriting Income
209
Blanket and per Program Licenses
210
Some Tips to Local Composers
211
CHAPTER 17 RESOURCES
212
Music and Technology Futures
213
Short Term Technological Hurdles
214
Electronic CommerceECash
215
Music on the Internet
216
Internet Cybercasts
217
Beyond the Internet
218
Themed Environments
219
Final Thoughts by Dick Weissman
220
CHAPTER 18 RESOURCES
224
The Global Marketplace
225
Organizations
228
Regional Arts Councils
232
State Humanities Councils
233
Young Audiences
237
National Arts and Humanities Councils
239
Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts Groups
240
Unions and Associations
243
Songwriters AssociationsUS
244
Songwriters OrganizationsCanada
246
Performing Rights OrganizationsUS
247
Education
250
Schools Offering Musical Instrument Repair Courses
251
Publications and Bibliography
252
Songwriter Tip Sheets
253
Radio Tip Sheets
254
The Best and Most Interesting
255
The Top Eight
258
Audio Engineering
259
Film
260
State Arts Councils
261
Music Industry Careers
263
Publicity
264
Songwriting and Music Publishing
265
Women in Music
266
Other Publications
267
Miscellaneous Books for Musicians
268
Music Print Publishers
269
Biography
270
Index
273
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