Making Advertisements and Making Them Pay

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1920 - Advertising - 262 pages
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Page 176 - The Churchyard abounds with images which find a mirror in every mind, and with sentiments to which every bosom returns an echo.
Page 56 - ... covered before a male of the highest eminence? A Continental would regard this last as boorish to the last degree; in greeting any equal or superior, male or female, actual or merely conventional, he lifts his head-piece. Why does it strike us as ludicrous to see a man in dress clothes before 6 pm ? The Continental puts them on whenever he has a solemn visit to make, whether the hour be six or noon. Why do we regard it as indecent to tuck the napkin between the waistcoat buttons — or into the...
Page 28 - I daresay often enough, that the business of writing demands two — the author and the reader. Add to this what is equally obvious, that the obligation of courtesy rests first with the author, who invites the seance, and commonly charges for it. What follows, but that in speaking or writing we have an obligation to put ourselves into the hearer's or reader's place? It is his comfort, his convenience, we have to consult. To express ourselves is a very small part of the business: very small and almost...
Page 192 - To bridle a goddess is no very delicate idea ; but why must she be bridled? because she longs to launch; an act which was never hindered by a bridle: and whither will she launch ? into a nobler strain. She is in the first line a horse, in the second a boat; and the care of the poet is to keep his horse or his boat from singing. The next composition is the far-famed Campaign, which Dr. Warton has termed a Gazette in Rhyme, with harshness not often used by the good-nature of his criticism.
Page 28 - All reading demands an effort. The energy, the good-will which a reader brings to the book is, and must be, partly expended in the labour of reading, marking, learning, inwardly digesting what the author means. The more difficulties, then, we authors obtrude on him by obscure or careless writing, the more we blunt the edge of his attention: so that if only in our own interest — though I had rather keep it on the ground of courtesy — we should study to anticipate his comfort.
Page 227 - The reputation of the service depends as much upon the efficiency of employees as upon the facilities provided by the company for the comfort of its patrons; it is imperative, therefore, that employees in serving passengers be obliging and courteous at all times — alert to anticipate their wants and diligent and cheerful in executing orders.
Page 82 - Whenever you feel an impulse to perpetrate a piece of exceptionally fine writing, obey it— whole-heartedly— and [From Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, On the Art of Writing. Reprinted by permission of the Cambridge University Press, Copyright 1923.] delete it before sending your manuscript to press. Murder your darlings.
Page 138 - is vulgar," writes TA Trollope, "because it arises from one of the most intrinsically vulgar of all the vulgar tendencies of a vulgar mind, — imitation. There are slang phrases which, because they vividly or graphically express a conception, or clothe it with humour, are admirable. But they are admirable only in the mouths of their inventors. " Of course it is an abuse of language to say that the beauty of a pretty girl strikes you with awe. But he who first said of some girl that she was ' awfully...
Page 26 - You have been told, I daresay often enough, that the business of writing demands two — the author and the reader. Add to this what is equally obvious, that the obligation of courtesy rests first with the author, who invites the seance, and commonly charges for it. What follows, but that in speaking or writing we have an obligation to put ourselves into the hearer's or reader's place? It is his comfort, his convenience, we have to consult.
Page 83 - ... does change the character of an establishment. Just when you decide that the sort of quality copy used by a merchant is entirely out of keeping with a business, you wake up to find that it has completely changed the class of his trade and that he is moving his shop to a better neighborhood where his customers prefer to shop. The history of many leading merchants in our large cities is the strongest proof of advertising power as a democratic force. It has lifted countless struggling merchants...

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