Making face, making soul

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Gloria Anzald˙a
Aunt Lute Foundation Books, 1990 - Literary Criticism - 402 pages
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A bold collection of creative pieces and theoretical essays by women of color. New thought and new dialogue: a book that will teach in the most multiple sense of that word: a book that will be of lasting value to many diverse communities of women as well as to students from those communities. The authors explore a full spectrum of present concerns in over seventy pieces that vary from writing by new talents to published pieces by Audre Lorde, Joy Harjo, Norma Alarcon and Trinh T. Minh-ha. "At one level or another, all the work in the collection seeks to find ways to understand and articulate our multiple identities and senses of place???."Making Face/Making Soul" is an exciting collection of dynamic, important writings that all women of color and white feminists will learn from, enjoy, and return to again and again and again."-"Sojourner" .,."the pieces are stunning in what they risk and reveal..."-"The San Francisco Chronicle"

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Contents

What The Gypsy Said To Her Children
3
Desert
10
Something About the Subject Makes It Hard to Name
20
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

A native of the Southwest, Anzaldua is a Chicana lesbian feminist theorist, creative writer, editor, and activist. She has taught Chicano studies, feminist studies, and writing at a number of universities. In addition, she has conducted writing workshops around the world and has been a contributing editor for the feminist literary journal Sinister Wisdom since 1984. She has also been active in the migrant farm workers movement. Anzaldua first came to critical attention with an anthology she coedited with Cherrie Moraga, another Chicana lesbian feminist theorist and writer. Titled This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color (1981), the anthology includes poetry, fiction, autobiographical writing, criticism, and theory by Chicana, African American, Asian American, and Native American women who advocate change in academia and the culture at large. Anzaldua is well known for her second book, Borderlands/La Frontera (1987). It combines prose and poetry, history, autobiography, and criticism in Spanish, English, as well as Tex-Mex and Nahautl. Its purpose is to interrogate and deconstruct sexual, psychological, and spiritual borderlands as well as the United States-Mexican border. In 1990 Many Faces/Making Souls was published. Anzaldua currently resides in Santa Cruz, California.

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