Making the Political: Founding and Action in the Political Theory of Zhang Shizhao

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 3, 2010 - Political Science
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Democratic political theory often sees collective action as the basis for non-coercive social change, assuming that its terms and practices are always self-evident and accessible. But what if we find ourselves in situations where collective action is not immediately available, or even widely intelligible? This book examines one of the most intellectually substantive and influential Chinese thinkers of the early twentieth century, Zhang Shizhao (1881–1973), who insisted that it is individuals who must 'make the political' before social movements or self-aware political communities have materialized. Zhang draws from British liberalism, democratic theory, and late-Imperial Confucianism to formulate new roles for effective individual action on personal, social, and institutional registers. In the process, he offers a vision of community that turns not on spontaneous consent or convergence on a shared goal, but on ongoing acts of exemplariness that inaugurate new, unpredictable contexts for effective personal action.
 

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this is the book i want to read: Leigh Jenco's reasearch is not quite relevant with the mainstream of the western philosophy; However i think her book is focusing on the future of philosophy. Rarely a few people are focusing on the eastern culture nowadays, Leigh Jenco is one of the best!

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Contents

Making the political
3
Zhang Shizhao and his world
29
Founding
43
The founding paradox
45
Rule by man and rule by law
72
Public private and the political
103
Action
135
Selfawareness
137
The selfuse of talent
162
Accommodation
193
A return to beginnings
226
notes on translated terms
237
Character list
248
Bibliography
258
Index
277
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About the author (2010)

Leigh Jenco (BA, Bard College; MA and PhD, University of Chicago) is a lecturer at the London School of Economics. Before moving to the LSE, she taught at the National University of Singapore for four years, and for 2007–2008 was appointed Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Political Theory Project, Brown University. She is winner of the 2008 Strauss Award for Best Dissertation in Political Philosophy, awarded by APSA, and has published articles in the American Political Science Review, Political Theory and the Journal of Asian Studies.

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