Malbone: An Oldport Romance

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Lee and Shepard, 1882 - 244 pages
 

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Page 2 - For no man of middle age can dare trust himself to portray life in its full intensity, as he has studied or shared it; he must resolutely set aside as indescribable the things most worth describing...
Page 207 - I can see no way out," pursued Hope. "Darling!" said Aunt Jane, with a voice full of womanly sweetness, " there is always a way out, or else the world would have stopped long ago. Perhaps it would have been better if it had stopped, but you see it has not. All we can do is to live on and try our best." She bade Hope leave Emilia to her, and furthermore stipulated that Hope should go to her pupils as usual, that afternoon, as it was their last lesson. The young girl shrank from the effort, but the...
Page 10 - She kept house from an easy-chair, and ruled her dependants with severity tempered by wit, and by the very sweetest voice in which reproof was ever uttered. She never praised them ; but if they did anything particularly well, rebuked them retrospectively, asking why they had never done it well before ? But she treated them munificently, made all manner of plans for their comfort, and they all thought her the wisest and wittiest of the human race. So did the youths and maidens of her large circle...
Page 23 - ... aunt ran not to the contrary. She always declared, indeed, that they were born married, and that their wedding-day would seem like a silver wedding. Harry was quiet, unobtrusive, and manly. He might seem commonplace at first beside the brilliant' Kate and his more gifted sister ; but thorough manhood is never commonplace, and he was a person to whom one could anchor. His strong, steadfast physique was the type of his whole nature ; when he came into the room, you felt as if a good many people...
Page 89 - ... vanished from this island forever, — the resting-place of a race whose very funerals would soon be no more. Each April the robins built their nests around these crumbling stones, each May they reared their broods, each June the clover blossomed, each July the wild strawberries grew cool and red ; all around was youth and life and ecstasy, and yet the stones bore inscriptions in an unknown language, and the very graves seemed dead. And lovelier than all the youth of Nature, little Emilia sat...
Page 70 - I shall then have nothing to do," she answered. " Nothing to do! " was the astonished reply ; " why, there is plenty to do ; cannot you stay at home and make pretty little things to wear, as other girls do?" " But I don't care for that," pleaded the spirited and thoughtful maiden; " I don't think I was created and educated merely to make pretty little things to wear.
Page 41 - She hated to be hurried in dressing, too; for she was accustomed to say that she must have leisure to understand herself, and this was clearly an affair of time. But she was never more charming than when, after dressing and breakfasting in seclusion, and then vigilantly watching her handmaiden through the necessary dustings and arrangements, she sat at last with her affairs in order to await events. Every day she expected something entirely new to happen, and was never disappointed. For she herself...
Page 40 - THE next morning had that luminous morning haze, not quite dense enough to be called a fog, which is often so lovely in Oldport. It was perfectly still; the tide swelled and swelled till it touched the edge of the green lawn behind the house, and seemed ready to submerge the slender pier; the water looked at first like glass, till closer gaze revealed long sinuous undulations, as if from unseen watersnakes beneath, A few rags of storm-cloud lay over the half-seen hills beyond the bay, and behind...
Page 4 - Corinthian capitals ; there are cherubs' heads and wings that go astray and lose themselves in closets and behind glass doors ; there are curling acanthus-leaves that cluster over shelves and ledges, and there are those graceful shell-patterns which one often sees on old furniture, but rarely in houses. The high...

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