Man and Superman: A Comedy and a Philosophy

Front Cover
Brentano's, 1903 - English drama (Comedy) - 244 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
3
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
1

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DanielSTJ - www.librarything.com

Man and Superman, the principle drama of this book, was the weakest part. I found that I did not enjoy Shaw's play-- which is off because I usually do garnish some sense of worth about it ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

If you remove the Don Juan in Hell sequence, this is actually an entertaining play, but GBS goes off on his tangents until you just want to slap him. Some very well-written, entertaining characters in an amusing situation. Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
47
IV
71
V
143
VI
177
VII
181
VIII
184
IX
191
XI
196
XII
199
XIII
201
XIV
208
XV
216
XVI
220
XVII
225
Copyright

X
194

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxxii - This is the true joy in life, the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one; the being thoroughly worn out before you are thrown on the scrap heap; the being a force of Nature instead of a feverish selfish little clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy.
Page 84 - I loved Ophelia: forty thousand brothers Could not with all their quantity of love, Make up my sum.
Page 227 - I will do unto others as I would they should do unto me.' 1903 GB SHAW Man & Superman 227 Do not do unto others as you would that they should do unto you.
Page 22 - Quite unscrupulous. The true artist will let his wife starve, his children go barefoot, his mother drudge for his living at seventy, sooner than work at anything but his art. To women he is half vivisector, half vampire. He gets into intimate relations with them to study them, to strip the mask of convention from them, to surprise their inmost secrets, knowing that they have the power to rouse his deepest creative energies, to rescue him from his cold reason, to make him see visions and dream dreams,...
Page 238 - The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.
Page 22 - To women he is half vivisector, half vampire. He gets into intimate relations with them to study them, to strip the mask of convention from them, to surprise their inmost secrets, knowing that they have the power to rouse his deepest creative energies, to rescue him from his cold reason, to make him see visions and dream dreams, to inspire him, as he calls it. He persuades women that they may do this for their own purpose whilst he really means them to do it for his.
Page 119 - I knew what she would be like in thirty years' time. I noted the gleam of gold from a dead tooth in the laughing mouth: I made curious observations of the strange odors of the chemistry of the nerves. The visions of my romantic reveries, in which I had trod the plains of heaven with a deathless, ageless creature of coral and ivory, deserted me in that supreme hour. I remembered them and desperately strove to recover their illusion; but they now seemed the emptiest of inventions: my judgment was not...
Page 134 - The philosopher is Nature's pilot. And there you have our difference: to be in hell is to drift: to be in heaven is to steer.
Page 169 - I, who have always been an enigma and a possibility, shall be merely somebody else's property — and damaged goods at that: a secondhand man at best. ANN. Well, your wife can put on a cap and make herself ugly to keep you in countenance, like my grandmother. TANNER. So that she may make her triumph more insolent by publicly throwing away the bait the moment the trap snaps on the victim!
Page 87 - Instead of the Sierra there is nothing; omnipresent nothing. No sky, no peaks, no light, no sound, no time nor space, utter void. Then somewhere the beginning of a pallor, and with it a faint throbbing buzz as of a ghostly violoncello palpitating on the same note endlessly. A couple of ghostly violins presently take advantage of this bass CtUa r and therewith the pallor reveals a man in the void, an incorporeal but visible man, seated, absurdly enough, on nothing.

Bibliographic information