Man and Wife: A Novel, Volume 3

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Bernhard Tauchnitz, 1870 - 302 pages
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Review: Man and Wife

User Review  - Emma - Goodreads

Yet another Wilkie Collins years ahead of its time. Seriously: why does everyone think Charles Dickens is the greatest English Victorian novelist?? After The Law and the Lady's feminist heroine, we ... Read full review

Review: Man and Wife

User Review  - Laralee - Goodreads

Last January, a friend told me anything by Wilkie Collins is good. This is book #3 I've read and so far, she are right. Read full review

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Page 256 - And she opened a bottle of milk, and gave him drink, and covered him. And he said unto her, Stand in the door of the tent, and it shall be, when any man doth come and inquire of thee, and say, Is there any man here? that thou shalt say, No.
Page 168 - After reflecting for a moment, Geoffrey put a last question. " You said Bishopriggs and the woman would be here at six this evening." " Yes." " Where are they to be found before that ?" Mr. Moy wrote a few words on a slip of paper, and handed it to Geoffrey. " At their lodgings,
Page 41 - EXPLOSION. 39 in. The room was empty, like the rooms downstairs. But, close to the entrance, there was a trifling object to attract notice, in the shape of a note lying on the carpet. He picked it up, and saw that it was addressed to him, in the handwriting of his wife. He opened it. The note began, without the usual form of address, in these words:— "I know the abominable secret that you and my uncle have hidden from me. I know your infamy, and her infamy, and the position in which, thanks to...
Page 281 - I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up : while I suffer thy terrors I am distracted. 16. Thy fierce wrath gocth over me; thy terrors have cut me off. 17. They came round about me daily like water; they compassed me about together. 18. Lover and friend hast thou put far from me, and mine acquaintance into darkness. THE LAND OF FORGETFULNESS.
Page 131 - I've seen enough of her already," he said, brutally. "You may well be ashamed to look at her," said Sir Patrick, quietly. "But you might have acknowledged it in fitter words. Carry your memory back to the fourteenth of August. Do you deny that you promised to marry Miss Silvester privately at the Craig Fernie inn?" "I object to that question,
Page 123 - I answer, Sir Patrick, as Mr. Brinkworth has answered. No such thing as the thought of marrying him ever entered my head. ' ' "And this you say, on your oath as a Christian woman?" "On my oath as a Christian woman." Sir Patrick looked round at Blanche. Her face was hidden in her hands. Her stepmother was vainly appealing to her to compose herself. In the moment of silence that followed, Mr. Moy interfered in the interests of his client. "I waive my claim, Sir Patrick, to put any questions on my side....
Page 248 - ... I didn't understand what he meant. He turned to some person who was sitting on the bench with him. 'This is a hard case,' he says. 'Poor people in this condition of life don't even know what a marriage settlement means. And, if they did, how many of them could afford to pay the lawyer's charges?' Upon that he turned to me. 'Yours is a common case,
Page 195 - A small back door, in the end wall (intended probably for the gardener's use) was secured by a lock — the key having been taken out. There was not a house near. The lands of the local growers of vegetables surrounded the garden on all sides. In the nineteenth century, and in the immediate neighbourhood of a great metropolis, Anne was as absolutely isolated from all contact with the humanity around her as if she lay in her grave.
Page 120 - Arnold Brinkworth! answer for yourself, in the presence of the persons here assembled. In all that you said, and all that you did, while you were at the inn, were you not solely influenced by the wish to make Miss Silvester's position as little painful to her as possible, and by anxiety to carry out the instructions given'to you by Mr. Geoffrey Delamayn? Is that the whole truth?" "That is the whole truth, Sir Patrick.
Page 279 - There was a big tree hard by. I looked towards the tree, and waited to see the something hidden appear from behind it. The Thing stole out, dark and shadowy in the pleasant sunlight. At first, I saw only the dim figure of a woman. After a little, it began to get plainer, brightening from within...

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