Man's Place in the Universe: A Study of the Results of Scientific Research in Relation to the Unity Or Plurality of Worlds

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McClure, Phillips & Company, 1903 - Cosmology - 326 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
9
III
25
V
47
VI
73
VII
99
IX
135
X
156
XI
182
XII
190
XIII
205
XV
216
XVI
240
XVII
258
XIX
278
XXI
291

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Page 320 - Canst thou by searching find out God? canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection? It is as high as heaven; what canst thou do? deeper than hell; what canst thou know? The measure thereof is longer than the earth, and broader than the sea.
Page 320 - WILL my tiny spark of being wholly vanish in your deeps and heights? Must my day be dark by reason, O ye Heavens, of your boundless nights, Rush of Suns, and roll of systems, and your fiery clash of meteorites?
Page 102 - How does this fact consist with the hypothesis that nebulae are remote galaxies ? If there were but one nebula, it would be a curious coincidence were this one nebula so placed in the distant regions of space, as to agree in direction with a starless spot in our own sidereal system. If there were but two nebulae, and both were so placed, the coincidence would be excessively strange.
Page 58 - Throughout by far the larger portion of the extent of the Milk-y Way in both hemispheres, the general blackness of the ground of the heavens on which its stars are projected, and the absence of that innumerable multitude and excessive crowding of the smallest visible magnitudes, and of glare produced by the aggregate light of multitudes too small to affect the eye singly, which the contrary supposition would appear to necessitate, must, we think, be considered unequivocal indications that its dimensions...
Page 273 - In this earliest known varied life we find no evidence of its having lived near the beginning of the zoological series. In a broad sense, compared with what must have gone before, both biologically and physically, all the phenomena connected with this old period...
Page 138 - That collection of stars which we call the universe is limited in extent. The smallest stars that we see with the most powerful telescopes are not, for the most part, more distant than those a grade brighter, but are mostly stars of less luminosity, situate in the same regions. This does not preclude the possibility that far outside of our universe there may be other collections of stars of which we know nothing.
Page 167 - ... largely on the data. It may, therefore, well be that the small excess of 45 found within this strip is due to the fact that more stars were observed and investigated, and, therefore, more proper motions found. Besides this, some uncertainty may exist as to the reality of the minuter proper motions. The conclusion is interesting and important. If we should blot out from the sky all the stars having no proper motion large enough to be detected, we should find remaining stars of all magnitudes ;...
Page 55 - Sagittarii, where it suddenly collects into a vivid oval mass about 6 in length and 4 in breadth, so excessively rich in stars that a very moderate calculation makes their number exceed 100,000.
Page 146 - In some, for instance, extremely minute stars, though never altogether wanting, occur in numbers so moderate as to lead us irresistibly to the conclusion that in these regions we see fairly through the starry stratum...
Page vi - ... support to the view that our earth is the only inhabited planet, not only in the Solar System but in the whole stellar universe.

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