Management for engineers

Front Cover
J. Wiley, 1996 - Business & Economics - 592 pages
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Why should the student of engineering study management? Engineering skills alone do not meet real world requirements; they have to be supplemented by management training. In fact, after graduation, most engineers will find that their success depends as much on general management skills and understanding operational systems as on their technical expertise. To become a complete engineer, a student needs a firm foundation in these skills Management for Engineers provides such a foundation. Practical and accessible, the book aims to equip the reader with all the skills and management related topics covered in an undergraduate or graduate course in engineering management. Management for Engineers is based on the Engineering Management Programme at City University, London, a course which offers all its undergraduate engineers portable management skills, presenting them with the most recent management concepts and covering such issues as:
  • management of quality, materials and new product development
  • human resource management and communication
  • project management and critical path networks
  • management of the supply system and inventory control
  • employment law and the single European market
The authors have a combined experience of more than 80 years in senior management in industry. This practical management experience, which is brought to bear in the text, is enhanced by sections drawn from other management courses in particular from the unique MBA in Engineering Management and from the highly successful BSc in Management and Systems. The combination of real world experience and academic pedigree to be found in Management for Engineers makes this the most appropriate text for the student of today and the engineer of tomorrow

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Contents

BUSINESS BASICS 1 Business basics
3
The business environment
14
from Taylorism to McKinseys 7Ss
31
Copyright

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