Management of the school-room

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Page 43 - By Music, minds an equal temper know, Nor swell too high, nor sink too low. If in the breast tumultuous joys arise, Music her soft, assuasive voice applies ; Or, when the soul is press'd with cares, Exalts her in enlivening airs.
Page 14 - Where her springs are, her leaks; and how to stop 'em; What sands, what shelves, what rocks do threaten her; The forces and the natures of all winds, Gusts, storms, and tempests; when...
Page 14 - What sands, what shelves, what rocks do threaten her; The forces and the natures of all winds, Gusts, storms, and tempests; when her keel ploughs hell, And deck knocks heaven: then to manage her, Becomes the name and office of a pilot.
Page 14 - Each petty hand Can steer a ship becalm'd ; but he that will Govern and carry her to her ends, must know His tides, his currents ; how to shift his sails ; What she will bear in foul, what in fair weathers ; Where her springs are, her leaks ; and how to stop...
Page 32 - It is as much a part of your education to correct bad habits and obtain good ones, — to cultivate good manners, and learn to conduct with propriety on all occasions, as to be familiar with the studies pursued in school. Read carefully, and remember the following particulars. STILLNESS. 1. On entering the school, pass as quietly as possible to your seat, taking care to close the door gently, and avoid making unnecessary noise with the feet in crossing the room. 2. Take out books, slate, etc., from...
Page 32 - Take out books, slates, &c., from your desk with care, and lay them down in such a manner as not to be heard. Avoid making a rustling noise with papers, or noisily turning over leaves of books. Never let the marking of a pencil on your slate be heard. 3. Be careful to keep the feet quiet while engaged in study ; or, if it be necessary to move them, do it without noise. 4. In passing to and from recitations, observe whether you are moving quietly. Take special care if you wear thick shoes, or boots,...
Page 31 - The following directions are given, that all may know, at the beginning, what their duties are, as pupils, and on what conditions they are permitted to enjoy the privileges of this school, SECTION A.
Page 36 - If you have a good excuse, give it to your teacher, and go and hear the others recite. 2. A scholar must never have anything in his hands during recitation, nor during study hours, except what strictly belongs to the exercise in which he is engaged. 3. Do not rest satisfied with learning your lesson so as to "guess you can say it"; be able to give a clear and full account of it when...
Page 32 - Be careful to keep the feet quiet while engaged in study j or, if it be necessary to move them, do it without noise. 4. In passing to and from recitations, observe whether you are moving quietly. Take special care if you wear thick shoes or boots, or if they are made of squeaking leather. 5. Avoid the awkward and annoying habit of making a noise with the lips while studying. 6. Scuffling, — striking, — pushing, or rudeness of any kind must never be practised, in the least, under any circumstances,...
Page 34 - A place for every thing, and every thing in its place." REMARK. The habit of observing neatness and order should be cultivated as a virtue. 1. Let your shoes or boots be cleaned at the door-steps ; always use the mat, if wet, muddy or dirty. 2. Never suffer the floor under your desk, or the aisles around it, to be dirtied by papers, or anything else dropped on it. 3. Avoid spitting on the floor ; it is a vulgar, filthy habit. 4. Marking or writing on the desks, walls, or any part of the building,...

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