Managerial Issues in Productivity Analysis

Front Cover
Ali Dogramaci, Nabil R. Adam
Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 30, 1985 - Business & Economics - 246 pages
A. Dogramaci and N.R. Adam Productivity of a firm is influenced both by economic forces which act at the macro level and impose themselves on the individual firm as well as internal factors that result from decisions and processes which take place within the boundaries of the firm. Efforts towards increasing the produc tivity level of firms need to be based on a sound understanding of how the above processes take place. Our objective in this volume is to present some of the recent research work in this field. The volume consists of three parts. In part I, two macro issues are addressed (taxation and inflation) and their relation to produc tivity is analyzed. The second part of the volume focuses on methods for productivity analysis within the firm. Finally, the third part of the book deals with two additional productivity analysis techniques and their applications to public utilities. The objective of the volume is not to present a unified point of view, but rather to cover a sample of different methodologies and perspectives through original, scholarly papers.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Part One
3
Corporate Tax Policy and Economic Growth An Analysis 1981 and 1982 Tax Acts
5
22 The Estimation of Effective Tax Rates
8
19521980
17
24 The Tax acts of 1981 and 1982
22
25 User Costs and the Demand for Capital
25
Notes
30
66 Improving Managerial Evaluations of CAM Proposals
141
67 Some Problems of Implementation
149
68 Conclusions
158
Notes
159
References
160
Productivity Analysis Using Subjective Output Measures A Perceptual Mapping Approach for Knowledge Work Organizations
161
72 Present Approaches for Measuring Knowledge Work Effectiveness
163
73 An Integrated Approach to Measuring Effectiveness in Knowledge Work Organizations
165

References
33
Appendix to Chapter 2
37
Inflation and Productivity Growth
49
32 Measurement Problems
51
33 Real Efficiency Losses
57
34 Energy Price Effects
61
35 Conclusions
63
Notes
64
References
65
Appendix 1 to Chapter 3
69
Appendix 2 to Chapter 3
73
Part Two
79
NIPA A Model for Net Income and Productivity Analysis
81
42 The Model
84
43 The Data
92
44 The Results
96
45 Uses of NIPA
104
Notes
107
References
108
Productivity Measures Descriptive Averages Versus Analytical Needs
109
52 On the Vulnerability of Aggregate Measures of Productivity
110
53 On the Vulnerability of Analyses and Interpretations of IndustryLevel Changes in Productivity
114
54 Elements of a More Effective Approach to the Diagnosis and Improvement of Productivity Performance
119
55 Some Concluding Observations
128
Notes
130
Analyzing the Effects of ComputedAided Manufacturing Systems on Productivity and Competitiveness
133
62 Study Objectives
134
63 Some Common Elements in Evaluations of Major Equipment Acquisitions
135
64 On the Distinctive Capabilities of ComputerAided Manufacturing
136
65 Improving Managements Approach to Exploring CAM Potentials
138
74 Conclusions
178
Notes
179
References
181
Part Three
183
Measuring Efficiency in Production With an Application to Electric Utilities
185
82 The Production Technology
186
83 Measures of Technical Efficiency
189
84 Calculating the Efficiency Measures
197
85 An Application to Electric Utilities
200
86 Summary and Conclusions
204
Notes
212
References
213
Alternatives for ProductivityBased Pricing in Public Utility RegulationThe Case of Telecommunications
215
A Behavioral Model
217
93 Costs Rates and Productivity
218
94 A Comprehensive Interim ProductivityBased Rate Adjustment Clause
221
95 Productivity Incentives
223
96 Builtin Cost Efficiency Incentives
224
97 Builtin Rate of Return Incentives
225
98 Pricing Efficiency
226
99 Uncertainties and Efficiency in Planning and Control
227
910 Key Issues in Choosing Productivity and Cost Standards
228
Historical Perspective and Current Practice
232
912 Simulation Results
236
913 Concluding Remarks
238
Notes
239
Author Index
242
Subject Index
244
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