Managing Care: A Shared Responsibility

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Jan 7, 2006 - Medical - 218 pages
The goal of this book is to propose an alternative approach to address the problem of the exponential rise of health care costs, and, more importantly, to address the lingering dilemma of how to establish broadly agreed-upon fundamental guidelines by which health care can be managed in a manner that is more morally appropriate. Although in no way a new concept, the notion that society’s financial resources, even when it comes to health care, are indeed limited is one with which the general public has grown increasingly familiar only during the past two decades. Familiarity, however, does not automatically imply public appreciation for the strategies that have been implemented to curb the problems of health care. These strategies have customarily been designed to change the distribution of health care, such as by limiting patient choices, reducing access, lowering utilization, increasing premiums, requiring higher deductibles, or shifting financial responsibilities. In other words, the main focus has been on making the patient, or as the commodity market would say, the consumer, more responsible.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Justice and Health Care 107
2
A Dilemma for Ethicists
7
The Concept of Managed Care and Its Practical
31
History of Managed Care
37
Managed Care as Unknown Territory
45
Balancing Responsibilities
52
The Silent Partner
61
Conclusion
78
The Concept of Genuine Responsibility
81
The Notion of Responsibility
91
Key Presumptions
109
Revising the Template for Modeling Health Care
115
Theoretical Reflections
151
Justice as Appropriation
159
Copyright

The Context of Scarcity and Its Ideological Impact
72

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