Managing High Grade Dairy Cows in the Tropics

Front Cover
Csiro Publishing, Nov 1, 2012 - Technology & Engineering - 288 pages
Dairy consumption in Asia has more than doubled over the last 25 years, and has led to more than 50% of the world’s total dairy imports now entering Asian markets. Consequently, Asian countries are seeking to improve their self-sufficiency in dairy produce by developing their local milk industries. Asian livestock importers are looking for increasing numbers of high grade dairy stock from established dairy industries in countries such as Australia and New Zealand. Unfortunately, a major problem encountered throughout Asia has been the poor performance of these exotic high grade dairy heifers when exported from their country of origin to a new, more stressful environment. This has been due to a failure to prepare for their introduction. Exotic dairy cows, particularly those from farms with high levels of herd performance, have high management requirements. If subjected to local and traditional small holder dairy farm practices, they are unlikely to produce acceptable yields of milk or may not even get back into calf. Poor management practices can lead to low growth rates, delayed breeding, stock diseases and even deaths among imported stock both before and after first calving. Managing High Grade Dairy Cows in the Tropics addresses the entire range of management practices found on tropical small holder dairy farms, highlighting those which are likely to adversely impact on heifer and cow performance, hence farm profitability. It is a companion volume to three other manuals written by John Moran: Rearing Young Stock on Tropical Dairy Farms in Asia, Tropical Dairy Farming and Business Management for Tropical Dairy Farmers.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 Predeparture planning and management of stock on arrival
11
3 Soil and forage management on the new home farm
21
4 Young stock management
37
5 The principles of dairy nutrition
51
6 Feeding management of the milking herd
63
7 Disease prevention and control
75
8 Reproductive management
95
15 Adding value to milk
175
16 The business of small holder dairy farming
181
17 Conducting famer workshops on improved herd management
193
18 Assessing current farm management practices
199
19 Tips and traps in managing high grade dairy stock
207
Temperature Humidity Index
246
Abbreviations and conversion of units of measurements
247
Expectation and evaluation forms for workshop
250

9 Genetics
109
10 Managing stock surplus to the milking herd
117
11 Stock welfare
123
12 Environmental management
131
13 Housing systems
143
14 Milk harvesting and hygiene
161
Indonesian dairy small holder pamphlet
254
Glossary
258
References and further reading
261
Index
265
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

John Moran is a consultant with Profitable Dairy Systems, located in Kyabram, Victoria. His specialist fields include dairy production, ruminant nutrition, calf and heifer rearing, forage conservation and whole farm business management. In 2013, he was appointed as the Coordinator of the Asia Dairy Network, an international agency position to facilitate communication and collaboration of dairy industries from 15 countries throughout South and East Asia. Since 1999, he has initiated and conducted training programs on small holder dairy production to farmers, advisers and policy makers in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, China, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and East Timor. His books include "Tropical Dairy Farming, Calf Rearing, Heifer Rearing" and "Forage Conservation", and he has also published more than 200 research and extension articles and written several farmer manuals on cattle nutrition.

Bibliographic information