Managing White Supremacy: Race, Politics, and Citizenship in Jim Crow Virginia

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Univ of North Carolina Press, 2002 - History - 411 pages
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Tracing the erosion of white elite paternalism in Jim Crow Virginia, Douglas Smith reveals a surprising fluidity in southern racial politics in the decades between World War I and the Supreme Court's 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

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Contents

A Fine Discrimination Indeed PARTY POLITICS AND WHITE SUPREMACY FROM EMANCIPATION TO WORLD WAR I
19
Opportunities Found and Lost RACE AND POLITICS AFTER WORLD WAR I
40
Redefining Race THE CAMPAIGN FOR RACIAL PURITY
76
Educating Citizens or Servants? HAMPTON INSTITUTE AND THE DIVIDED MIND OF WHITE VIRGINIANS
107
Little Tyrannies and Petty Skullduggeries
130
A Melancholy Distinction VIRGINIAS RESPONSE TO LYNCHING
155
The Erosion of Paternalism CONFRONTING THE LIMITS OF MANAGED RACE RELATIONS
189
Traveling in Opposite Directions
219
Too Radical for Us THE PASSING OF MANAGED RACE RELATIONS
250
TOWARD THE SOUTH OF THE FUTURE
285
Notes
299
Bibliography
371
Index
397
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About the author (2002)

J. Douglas Smith is a visiting assistant professor of history at Occidental College in Los Angeles, California.

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