Managing Performance Improvement Projects: Preparing, Planning, Implementing

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Wiley, May 7, 1997 - Business & Economics - 256 pages
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Lead work projects from beginning to end . . . and make humanperformance technology happen!

Copublished with the International Society for PerformanceImprovement (ISPI)

Project teams are growing rapidly as performance improvementsolutions become more complex. Project management methods arebecoming necessary to successfully coordinate these large teams.Develop the skills you need to effectively manage your budget,time, and the quality of work on human performance technologyprojects. All the essential aspects of project development areaddressed, and the process is broken down into three main areas:preparing, planning, and implementing.

You'll develop the skills to:

  • Define projects
  • Accelerate project development
  • Obtain sponsorship
  • Act as a consultant
  • Plan infrastructures
  • Create work breakdown structures
  • Identify depAndency relationships
  • Manage resources and optimize the plans
  • Analyze risks and plan for contingencies
  • Estimate schedules . . . and more!

Learn what needs to be done after you finish a project to ensuresuccess. Don't just squeak by with mediocre management. Mediocremanagement can stifle the development of great ideas. Ideas willget projects started. But you won't achieve superior resultswithout effective management.

Implement Fuller's project management process today and getresults!

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Contents

Defining the Project
9
Accelerating Project Development
27
Obtaining Project Sponsorship
51
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

JIM FULLER is the manager of Learning and Performance Technology at the Hewlett-Packard Company, which represents H-P's research and development efforts in the areas of learning and performance. He also teaches graduate courses in performance technology at Boise State University and is a frequent speaker at conferences sponsored by the International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI), the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD), and Lakewood. He lives in San Jose, California.

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