Mandating Identity: Citizenship, Kinship Laws and Plural Nationality in the European Union

Front Cover
Kluwer Law International, 2008 - Law - 388 pages
0 Reviews
In this original and insightful analysis, Enikő Horv th focuses on three processes of legal evolution in Europe that affect the meaning of membership and individual identity: * the increasing salience of supranational 'culture' and rights; * 'kinship' legislation privileging non-nationals with linguistic, cultural, and ethnic ties to a given state; and * the emergence of plural nationality as an acceptable (and even welcome) phenomenon. The author's treatment is notable for its informed appreciation of both the content of relevant European and national laws and the ways in which these laws are embedded in particular social and political frameworks. In addition to extending the legal theory on citizenship and nationality, the analysis draws on sociology, social psychology, and political theory to anchor its insights and recommendations. After two in-depth chapters introducing the complexities of the subject matter, three distinct but interwoven chapters show how each of the three processes has unfolded in a given context, offer detailed explanations and suggestions as to why each development has occurred in the manner that it has, and discuss the legal, political, and sociological issues raised by the particular development. A comprehensive reference section with extensive lists of laws, cases, and scholarship concludes the volume.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
1
III
67
IV
137
V
213
VI
301
VII
317
VIII
383
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information