Mantrapped

Front Cover
Wheeler Pub., 2005 - Fiction - 424 pages
In her new novel, Mantrapped, Fay Weldon shows she's still on top as the foremost chronicler of this generation's sexual and marital woes. What would happen if a man were to wake up one morning as a woman? Or a woman as a man? Would his personality change completely? Would hers? After brushing past each other on the stairs above their local Laundromat, Trisha and Peter soon find out. Instantly, and mysteriously, they switch souls. Peter's now housed in Trisha's older and much curvier body, while Trisha's moving about in Peter's younger, trimmer form. But none of this is half as awkward as when they both come home to face Peter's wife and have to decide who will sleep where. Exploring her heroes' predicaments inspires Fay to recall certain points in her life, which she decides to insert alongside the novel, flipping back and forth between the two. The result is an inventive continuation of her critically acclaimed memoir, Auto da Fay, which flaunts her remarkable talent for pushing the boundaries of literature farther while always keeping it fun.

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MANTRAPPED

User Review  - www.kirkusreviews.com

Though billed as a novel, this very slight tale of a man and woman who switch souls on a stairway cedes about half its pages to an acerbic continuation of Weldon's recent memoir, Auto da Fay (2003).If ... Read full review

Mantrapped

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Almost all writers draw on aspects of their own lives for the raw material of their books, but only someone as talented as Weldon--provocative, witty, and refreshing even at the worst of times--could ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
16
Section 3
17
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Fay Weldon was born in Worcester, England on September 22, 1931. She read economics and psychology at the University of St. Andrews. She worked as a propaganda writer for the British Foreign Office and then as an advertising copywriter for various firms in London before making writing a full-time career. Her work includes over twenty novels, five collections of short stories, several children's books, non-fiction books, and a number of plays written for television, radio and the stage. Her collections of short stories include Mischief and Nothing to Wear and Nowhere to Hide. She wrote a memoir entitled Auto Da Fay and non-fiction book entitled What Makes Women Happy. She wrote the pilot episode for the television series Upstairs Downstairs. Her first novel, The Fat Woman's Joke, was published in 1967. Her other novels include Praxis, The Life and Loves of a She-Devil, Puffball, Rhode Island Blues, Mantrapped, She May Not Leave, The Spa Decameron, Habits of the House, Long Live the King, and The New Countess. Wicked Women won the PEN/Macmillan Silver Pen Award. She was awarded a CBE in 2001.

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