Manual of Bacteriology

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Page 90 - Dissolve the sublimate in the salt solution by heat ; the separation of crystals on cooling shows that the solution is saturated. For small pieces of tissue j inch in thickness, twelve hours' immersion is sufficient. If the pieces are larger, twenty-four hours is necessary. They should then be tied up in a piece of gauze, and placed in a stream of running water for from twelve to twenty-four hours, according to the size of the pieces, to wash out the excess of sublimate. They are then placed for...
Page 459 - ... presence of oxygen, or in a current of air. (2) By passing through the tissues of one species of animal (becomes attenuated for another species). (3) By growing at abnormal temperatures, etc. (4) By growing in the presence of weak antiseptics, or by injecting the latter along with the organism, etc. (b) In a virulent condition, in non-lethal doses. 2. By injection of the dead organisms. 3. By injection of filtered bacterial cultures, ie, toxines; or of chemical substances derived from these.
Page 460 - In the first place, practically every organism, when cultivated for some time outside the body, loses its virulence, and in the case of some this is very marked indeed, eg the pneumococcus. Pasteur found in the case of chicken cholera, that when cultures were kept for a long time in ordinary conditions, they gradually lost their virulence, and that when sub-cultures were made, the diminished virulence persisted. Such attenuated cultures could be used for protective inoculation. He considered the...
Page 174 - ... the long axis of the chain. It stains readily with all the basic aniline dyes, and retains the colour in Gram's method. Cultivation. — It grows readily in all the ordinary media at the room temperature, though much more rapidly at the temperature of the body. In stab-cultures in peptone gelatin a streak of growth is visible on the day after inoculation, and on the second or third day, liquefaction commences at the top. As liquefaction proceeds, the growth falls to the bottom as a flocculent...
Page 573 - Floating Matter of the Air in Relation to Putrefaction and Infection," London, 1881; HC Bastian, "The Beginnings of Life,
Page 15 - The thiothrix group resembles the last in structure, and the protoplasm also contains sulphur granules ; but the filaments are attached at one end, and at the other form gonidia. The leptothrix group resembles closely the thiothrix group, but the protoplasm does not contain sulphur granules. In the cladothrix group there is the appearance of branching, which, however, is of a false kind. What happens is that a terminal cell divides, and on dividing again, it pushes the product of its first division...
Page 94 - It is therefore called a basic aniline dye. On the other hand, ammonium picrate owes its action to the picric acid part of the molecule. It is therefore termed an acid aniline dye. These two groups have affinities for different parts of the animal cell. The basic stains have a~ special...
Page 167 - Amongst the properties of the extracellular toxins, however, are the following: They are certainly all uncrystallisable ; they are soluble in water and they are dialysable ; they are precipitated along with proteids by concentrated alcohol, and also by ammonium sulphate ; if they are proteids they are either albumoses or allied to the albumoses ; they are relatively unstable, having their toxicity diminished or destroyed by heat (the degree of heat which is destructive varies much in different cases),...
Page 169 - Ricinits communis and the Abrus precatorius (jequirity) respectively. From the Robinia pseudacacia another poison — robin — belonging to the same group is obtained. The chemical reactions of ricin and abrin correspond to those of the bacterial toxins. They are soluble in water, they are precipitable by alcohol, but being less easily dialysable than the albumoses they have been called toxalbumins. Their toxicity is seriously impaired by boiling, and they also gradually become less toxic on being...
Page 282 - M'Fadyean showed that the serum of glandered horses possessed the power of agglutinating glanders bacilli. His later observations show that in the great majority of cases of glanders a I in 50 dilution of the serum produces marked agglutination in a few minutes, whilst in the great majority of non-glandered animals no effect is produced under these conditions. The test performed in the ordinary way is, however, not absolutely reliable, as exceptions occasionally occur in both directions, ie negative...

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