Manual of bacteriology

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1913 - Medical - 736 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 551 - ARTIFICIAL IMMUNITY. A. Active Immunity — ie produced in an animal by an injection, or by a series of injections, of non-lethal doses of an organism or its toxins. 1. By injection of the living organisms. (a) Attenuated in various ways. Examples : — (1) By growing in the presence of oxygen, or in a current of air. (2) By passing through the tissues of one species of animal (becomes attenuated for another species). (3) By growing at abnormal temperatures, etc. (4) By growing in the presence of...
Page 553 - In the first place, practically every organism, when cultivated for some time outside the body, loses its virulence, and in the case of some this is very marked indeed, eg the pneumococcus. Pasteur found in the case of chicken cholera, that when cultures were kept for a long time in ordinary conditions, they gradually lost their virulence, and that when sub-cultures were made, the diminished virulence persisted. Such attenuated cultures could be used for protective inoculation. He considered the...
Page 208 - ... the long axis of the chain. It stains readily with all the basic aniline dyes, and retains the colour in Gram's method. Cultivation. — It grows readily in all the ordinary media at the room temperature, though much more rapidly at the temperature of the body. In stab-cultures in peptone gelatin a streak of growth is visible on the day after inoculation, and on the second or third day, liquefaction commences at the top. As liquefaction proceeds, the growth falls to the bottom as a flocculent...
Page 693 - Floating Matter of the Air in Relation to Putrefaction and Infection," London, 1881; HC Bastian, "The Beginnings of Life,
Page 640 - The bulk of evidence goes to show that the same type of fever is reproduced as was present in the patient from whom the blood was taken. Methods of Examination. — The parasites may be studied by examining the blood in the fresh condition, or by permanent preparations. In the former case, a slide and cover-glass having been thoroughly cleaned, a small drop of blood from the finger or lobe of the ear is caught by the cover-glass, and allowed to spread out between it and the slide. It ought to be...
Page 117 - One gram of methylene blue (Griibler's) is dissolved in 20 cc of 96 per cent, alcohol, which is then mixed with 950 cc of distilled water, and 50 cc of glacial acetic acid. (b) Two grams of Bismarck brown are dissolved in one litre of boiling distilled water and filtered.
Page 97 - They should then be tied up in a piece of gauze, and placed in a stream of running water for from twelve to twenty-four hours, according to the size of the pieces, to wash out the excess of sublimate. They are then placed for twenty-four hours in each of the following strengths of methylated spirit (free from naphtha1): 30 per cent, 60 per cent, and 90 per cent.
Page 104 - ... adding fresh drops of water and using fresh pieces of filter paper, the specimen is washed without any violent application of water, and the bacteria are not displaced. For the general staining of films a saturated watery solution of methylene-blue will be found to be the best stain to commence with. The Use of Mordants and Decolorising Agents. — In films of blood and pus, and still more so in sections of tissues, if the above methods are used, the tissue elements may be stained to such an...
Page 222 - Second, by natural channels, such as the ureters and the bile-ducts, the spread being generally associated with an inflammatory condition of the lining epithelium. In this way the kidneys and liver respectively may be infected. Third, by the blood-vessels : (a) by a few organisms gaining entrance to the blood from a local lesion, and settling in a favourable nidus or a damaged tissue, the original path of infection often being obscure...
Page 500 - ... method has been systematically tested by inoculating a certain proportion of the inhabitants of districts exposed to infection, leaving others uninoculated, and then observing the proportion of cases of disease and the mortality amongst the two classes. The results of inoculation, as attested by the Indian Commission, have been distinctly satisfactory. For although absolute protection is not afforded by inoculation, both the proportion of cases of plague and the percentage mortality amongst these...

Bibliographic information