Manual of Classical Literature

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E.C. Biddle, 1843 - Art - 690 pages
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Contents

Iliac Table 2326 Lyric poetry 27 134 Hephaestion W 135 Apollonius Dys
33
Power of the kings 35 Their retinue
37
Porches Odea Ceramicus 112 113
41
Their armies how composed
44
general division of Asia 151155 Coun
46
Pluto 3537 Apollo 3840 Diana 132137
47
Febraterie
54
meals 53 Social repasts 54 Dress
55
Satyre 45 Different forms of Sa 145 Eustathius 140 Gregorius Pardus
56
177
59
Venus Cupid 5154 Vulcan 5556 118133 118 Three periods
61
divisions of time day month and year
63
creased 65 a Temples more splendid
65
gods p 113124 nored specially among their own people
68
8 Aſ Aquas
69
Oaths Leagues 70 Oracles
72
Taparura Taphrura
75
Moschus Ş 70 Callimachus Ş 71 Ara 157 Chion 158 Aristanetus W 159
76
class 69 70 Coelus Ş71 72 Sol or He cules 125 126 Theseus W 127 128
77
Adonis of Bacchus of Ceres of Minerva
83
Messana
84
Nemesis 84 AEsculapius Ş 85 Plutus 132 Heroes of the Trojan war 133
86
three classes I In scriptions
87
References to works on Greek inscriptions
93
known in the heroic ages S S3 Eloquence speculation in the early religious philoso
95
distinguished by peculiarities 92 Draco
98
Forms of letters on Greek coins
99
known or criteria of Palaeography 105
105
The Forty The Diatetae 112
114
Sparta 123 The Senate Ephori
125
retained especially by the Spartans W
136
p 517523
141
Persons liable to military duty Their
142
cities 149 Treatment of captured places
150
rewards and punishments W 152 Means
156
meaning of the term 155 156 Origin
159
102 Bronze 103 Classes of Statues
165
The different meals Manner of II Civil Affairs p 248270
172
Basreliefs 167 Mosaic 168
175
Sophists 109 Their performances
185
Strabo 217 Dionysius Periegetes 218
218
ces whence the traditionary fables of
224
PART III
225
historians in the brilliant period of Greek
235
Dionysius Halicarnasseus
248
History p 536541
261
of the Roman empire 192 Proportion III AFFAIRs of WAR p 270285
270
of soldiers and other citizens W 193 The 275309 W 275 Authorities on
280
ligio 200 Origin of the religion of the Auxiliaries 293 Attendants upon
298
Silarum
302
fices 207 Several orders of priests 208 Modes of defence in a siege 301
303
Introduction p 307321
307
this part 198201 Methods of ascertain
308
sacrorum S 214 Flamines 215 Salii Rewards of generals 306 Laws on
313
arch ºtologY OF GREEK Literature
323
forms 309312 Tragedy 313317 death of Augustus 419 Chief gram
329
manuscripts 107 Notice of some of
330
Rehearsals public and private 68
340
The Fable 338341 The Epigram 429 A lius Donatus 430 lacrobius
348
arcii AeoLOGY OF ROMAN Literature
359
letters 116 The early and later ortho
365
Preliminary Remarks p 379381
379
Propertius 362 Virgil 363 thors 439 Romance scarcely found
381
word Art 145 Divisions of the arts into
391
PART
433
Aufi lemus
443
Calpurnius 385 Ausonius Proba of the rise of philosophy at Rome
450
earliest ages 391 Influence of Greek 454 Example of Marcus Aurelius
459
of Crassus and Antony the Orator 395 Cynic 460 Epicurean 461 Skeptic
465
the later ages 402 Panegyrical oratory 471 Apuleius 472 Petronius Arbiter
477
Rhetoricians and Grammarians 408 Romans Survey of the Empire 4S1
483
ence of the Grammarian 417 The an Solinus 496 Vibius Sequester
497
mythology similar to those of the Grecian in this department lost Reason for
507
ROMAN LiterATURE
549
Cornelius Nepos 531 Titus Livius nus Codex Theodosianus Code
569
nus Maximus 534 Tacitus 535 Arrangements of Théodosius for reducing
638
in low estimation at Rome 544 Early
649
T retarie t
662
A ſee alºrure
672
Medical writers in later times 549 573575 573 Editions of
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Page 134 - Echidna ; a monster having the head and breasts of a woman, the body of a dog, the tail of a serpent, the wings of a bird, the paws of a lion, with a human voice.
Page 357 - It was sent as a present to King Charles I. from Cyrillus Lucaris, a native of Crete, and patriarch of Constantinople, by Sir Thomas Rowe, ambassador from England to the Grand Seignior, in the year 1628. Cyrillus brought it with him from Alexandria, where, probably, it was written. In a schedule annexed to it, he gives this account ; that it was written, as tradition informed them, by Thecla, a noble Egyptian lady, about thirteen hundred years ago, a little after the council of Nice.
Page 120 - Virile fortune, and after burning incense and stripping themselves of their garments, they entreated the goddess to hide from the eyes of their husbands whatever defects there might be on their bodies. The goddess of fortune is represented on ancient monuments with a horn of plenty, and sometimes two, in her hands. She is blindfolded, and generally holds a wheel in her hands as an emblem of her inconstancy. Sometimes she appears with wings, and treads upon the prow of л ship, and holds a rudder...
Page 228 - The multitude of subjects of an inferior rank was uncertain and fluctuating. But, after weighing with attention every circumstance which could influence the balance, it seems probable that there existed in the time of Claudius about twice as many provincials as there were citizens, of either sex and of every age; and that the slaves were at least equal in number to the free inhabitants of the Roman world.
Page 116 - These words, therefore, were employed to express not only the actual body in the heavens, but also a supposed being having a separate and personal existence. In the Homeric Hymn addressed to Helius, he is called the son of Hyperion and Euryphaëssa.
Page 108 - was an Oriental title of the sun, signifying Lord ; and the boar, supposed to have killed him, was the emblem of winter; during which the productive powers of nature being suspended, Venus was said to lament the loss of Adonis until he was again restored to life...
Page 131 - In Roman mythology these are found among the demons of the Genii. Although often spoken of as the spirits or souls of the departed, they seem more commonly to have been considered as guardians of the deceased, whose office was to watch over their graves, and hinder any disturbance of their tranquillity.
Page 156 - Tents like those now in use seem to have been a late invention. The ancients, on desultory expeditions and in marching through a country, slept with no shelter but their cloaks, as our light troops often carry none but a blanket; when they remained long on a spot they hutted. Achilles' tent or hut was built of fir, and thatched with reeds; and it seems to have had several apartments.
Page 259 - By the chests were placed some of the public servants, who, taking out the tablets of every century, for every tablet made a prick or a point in another tablet, which they kept by them. Thus the business being decided by most points, gave occasion to the phrase of Omne tulit punctwm a, and the like.
Page 150 - ... the altar and pavement. Thus the roofless temple might be said to be finished; but whether this primeval structure existed in his native country during the age of Homer, does not appear. We remark here a very striking resemblance between the ancient places of devotion in Greece, and the Druidical temple of the more northern regions. In fact, the astonishing remains at Stonehenge present the best known, and perhaps one of the most stupendous examples ever erected of the open temple.

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