Manual of classical literature: from the German of J.J. Eschenburg ... With additions ...

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E. C. & J. Biddle, 1849 - Art, Ancient - 690 pages
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Page 226 - ... every circumstance which could influence the balance, it seems probable, that there existed, in the time of Claudius, about twice as many provincials as there were citizens, of either sex, and of every age ; and that the slaves were at least equal in number to the free inhabitants of the Roman world. The total amount of this imperfect calculation would rise to about one hundred and twenty millions of persons : a degree of population which possibly "exceeds that of modern Europe,' and forms the...
Page 132 - A monster, having the head and breasts of a woman, the body of a dog, the tail of a serpent, the wings of a bird, and the paws of a lion.
Page 312 - On which (foundation) he says, " an edifice has been erected of a more useful and wonderful kind than any which have exercised human ingenuity. They were uttered at first, and probably for several generations, in an insulated manner. The circumstances of the actions were communicated by gestures, and the variable tunes of the voice ; but the actions themselves were expressed by their suitable monosyllable."— p.
Page 256 - Oral. i. 52. 1. The senate assumed to themselves the guardianship of the public religion ; so that no new god could be introduced, nor altar erected, nor the sibylline books consulted, without their order, Liv.
Page 118 - The goddess of fortune is represented on ancient monuments with a horn of plenty, and sometimes two, in her hands. She is blindfolded, and generally holds a wheel in her hands as an emblem of her inconstancy. Sometimes she appears with wings, and treads upon the prow of a ship, and holds a rudder in her hands.
Page 225 - The multitude of subjects of an inferior rank was uncertain and fluctuating. But, after weighing with attention every circumstance which could influence the balance, it seems probable that there existed, in the time of Claudius, about twice as many provincials as there were citizens, of either sex, and of every age; and that the slaves were at least equal in number to the free inhabitants of the Roman world.
Page 18 - The month of January was sacred to him, as were also all gates and doors. The gates of his temple were always kept open in time of war and shut in time of peace. The fire upon the household hearth was regarded as the symbol of the goddess Vesta. Her worship was a favorite one with the Romans. The nation, too, as a single great family, had a common national hearth in the Temple of Vesta, where the sacred fires were kept burning from generation to generation...
Page 296 - ... 5. The better kinds of wine were usually valued more highly in proportion to their age. None of the more generous wines were reckoned fit for drinking before the fifth year, and the majority of them were kept for a much longer period. The most pleasant and grateful for drinking, however, was that of a middle age ; although the older might command a higher price. The opulent Roman, as has been mentioned, attached vast importance to his wine establishment. Hence to the house and villa of every...
Page 234 - When a general had obtained a signal victory, a thanksgiving was decreed by the Senate to be made in all the temples ; and what was called a Ltctisternium took place, when couches were spread for the...
Page 490 - All these are said to have acquired very considerable riches by their profession. Their success, therefore, invited numbers to follow their example ; and Greece, but especially Athens, shortly abounded with those, who, under the name of sophists or professors of wisdom, undertook to teach every science.

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