Manual of human histology, Volume 1

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Sydenham Society, 1853 - Histology
 

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Page 189 - ... at the end of the third or at the beginning of the fourth month, upon the forehead and eyebrows. They consist of papilliform masses of cells 0-02'
Page 211 - The duct has often a distinct cavity in the epidermis, at other times there is a granular streak in the place of it, which is probably either a secretion or a deposit from the secretion. The sweat-pores, whose disposition, corresponding with that of the glands, is sometimes very regular, at others more irregular, are distinguishable, even with the naked eye, in the palm of the hand and sole of the foot. In other localities they are visible only with the aid of the microscope; occasionally the excretory...
Page 428 - Stilling, which at all events, among all observations on the subject, have gone most deeply into the matter. The nerves in question arise, without exception, not from the columns or fibrous substance, out of which they proceed, but all penetrate more or less deeply into the central parts, and all probably become connected, some not till they have decussated like the trochleares, with definite parts of the grey substance, which Stilling not inappropriately terms nervenuclei (accessory nucleus, for...
Page 377 - The cells appear to have increased in size at the cost of the processes which existed at an early stage of development and formed a bond of union between them. Everywhere about growing bone, a careful examination will reveal cells attached to its surface, while the surface of the bone itself will present a series of similar bodies ossified. To these we propose to give the name of osteal cells, as distinguished from lacunal and other cells. In microscopic characters, the osteal cells closely resemble...
Page 136 - ... differs in different persons and in different parts of the body. It is deepest around the nipple, especially in women during pregnancy and after they have borne children. A more or less dark pigment...
Page 469 - ... situated between the cells inclosed by the capsule. B. THE HAIR. The hair and nails are regarded as special differentiations of the skin. Hair is found distributed over almost the entire extent of the skin, varying, however, in quantity and arrangement in different regions. None whatever is present in the palm of the hand and sole of the foot. In the third fetal month small papillary elevations of the skin are seen to develop in those areas in which the hairy growth later appears. Under each...
Page 2 - Anatomy has thus escaped the danger of becoming, as in earlier days, lost iu minutiae. In the year 1838, in fact, the demonstration by Dr. Th. Schwann, of the originally perfectly identical cellular composition of all animal organisms, and of the origin of their higher structures from these elements, afforded the appropriate conception which united all previous observations, and afforded a clue for further investigations. If Bichat founded histology more theoretically by constructing a system and...
Page 369 - To this class belong, the upper half of the expanded portion of the occipital bone, the parietal, and frontal bones, the squamous portion and tympanic ring of the temporal bone, the nasal, lachrymal, malar and...
Page 5 - ... obtain a general view of all the divisions of the animal kingdom, and then, by the methods above described, strive to develop their laws. As regards the general propositions of Histology, the science has made no important progress since Schwann, however much has been attained by the confirmation of the broad outlines of his doctrines. The position that all the higher animals at one time consist wholly of cells and develop from these their higher elementary parts, stands...
Page 489 - Fig. 166. teaches nothing with respect to the proper origin of the white substance. Since, however, it can be proved, that the fibres, whilst they undergo this change, do not alter in size, the supposition I have expressed would still appear the more correct. The development of the terminations of the nerves, which appears in some respects to present conditions different from those exhibited in the trunks, may, as I have shown ('Annal. d. sc.

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