Manuscripts and Ghosts: Essays on the Transmission of Medieval and Early Renaissance Literature

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Four Courts Press, 2006 - Antiques & Collectibles - 320 pages
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Before the development of printing in the mid-15th century the written culture of Europe was transmitted through manuscripts. This collection of essays, which concentrates mainly on the late medieval period in England, explores how manuscript books were made, who made them, who owned them, and how they passed from one owner to another. Some deal with how particular manuscripts signify, how their layout and execution generate meaning. Some deal more generally with what manuscripts reveal about the ways in which literary culture was transmitted and about the importance of manuscripts in the interpretation of that culture. The subjects of these essays include, amongst other things, studies of an Anglo- Saxon riddle on the destruction of manuscripts, Chaucer‚??s famous poem on ‚??Adam‚?? his own scribe, a Lollard Bible owned by a succession of religious dissidents, two manuscripts of the Middle English Brut chronicle, and Trinity College Dublin MS 160, one of the most authoritative collections of early Tudor poetry.

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Contents

List of Illustrations
11
The Evangelist as Writer Dublin Trinity College Library MS 53 fol 24v Frontispiece
16
The Copying of Medieval and Early Renaissance Manuscripts
21
The opening of John Benets text of The Five Dogs of London Dublin
47
The Four Evangelists as Writers Dublin Royal Irish Academy Library
75
Riddle 4J and Memory
83
Political Context Date and Composition of The Sayings
95
An Unpublished Middle English Poem from London
107
A Lollard Bible
163
Chapter
167
Dublin Trinity College Library MS 75 fol 196v
173
Dublin Trinity College
181
Chapter 10
190
A French Scribe
198
Chapter 11
202
Some Illustrations of the Unicorn Apologue from Barlaam
215

The Tradition
115
Two Medieval Book Lists
128
The Authorship of The Boke ofCupide
134
The tombslab of Sir William Neville and Sir John Clanvowe Istanbul
145
An Unrecorded Fragment of the Prose Lancelot in Dublin
151
Chapter 8
152
The Function of the Illustrations
228
London Thou Art the Flour of Cities All
252
Two Unrecorded Poems from Dublin Trinity College
269
Index of Manuscripts
305
Copyright

About the author (2006)

John Scattergood is Professor of Medieval and Renaissance English, Trinity College Dublin.

Bibliographic information