Mapping Subaltern Studies and the Postcolonial

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Vinayak Chaturvedi
Verso Books, Nov 13, 2012 - Political Science - 384 pages
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Inspired by Antonio Gramsci’s writings on the history of subaltern classes, the authors in Mapping Subaltern Studies and the Postcolonial sought to contest the elite histories of Indian nationalists by adopting the paradigm of “history from below.” Later on, the project shifted from its social history origins by drawing upon an eclectic group of thinkers that included Edward Said, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, and Jacques Derrida. This book provides a comprehensive balance sheet of the project and its developments, including Ranajit Guha’s original subaltern studies manifesto, Partha Chatterjee, Dipesh Chakrabarty, and Gayatri Spivak.
 

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Contents

Partha Chatterjee
8
Gramsci and Peasant Subalternity in India
24
E P Thompson
50
Subaltern Studies and Histories
72
Rallying Around the Subaltern
116
Moral Economists Subalterns New Social Movements
127
Perspectives from Indian Historiography
163
Rosalind OHanlon and David Washbrook
191
1O Can the Subaltern Ride? A Reply to OHanlon
220
Saidian Frameworks in the Writing
239
Radical Histories and Question of Enlightenment
256
The Struggle to Write Subaltern
281
The Decline of the Subaltern in Subaltern Studies
300
A Silent Interview
324
APPENDIXZ SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
341
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Vinayak Chaturvedi is a Professor of History at the University of California in Irvine.

Gyan Prakash (Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania) is professor of modern Indian history at Princeton University and a member of the Subaltern Studies Editorial Collective. He is the author of Bonded Histories: Genealogies of Labor Servitude in Colonial India (1990), Another Reason: Science and the Imagination of Modern India (1999) and Mumbai Fables (2010). Professor Prakash edited After Colonialism: Imperial Histories and Postcolonial Displacements (1995) and Noir Urbanisms (2010), codited The Space of the Modern City (2008) and Utopia/Dystopia (2010), and has written a number of articles on colonialism and history writing. He is currently working on a history of the city of Bombay. With Robert Tignor, he introduced the modern world history course at Princeton University.

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