March: Book one

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Top Shelf Productions, 2013 - African American civil rights workers - 121 pages
106 Reviews
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This graphic novel is a first-hand account of Congressman John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book one spans Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. HIs commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington D.C., and from receiving beatings from state troopers, to receiving the Medal of Freedom awarded to him by Barack Obama, the first African-American president -- From cover flaps.

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User Review  - jennybeast - LibraryThing

I'm sad to say that my school really didn't spend as much time on the American Civil Rights movement as it did on things British, so for me this was not only a very moving personal memoir, but also a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jennybeast - LibraryThing

I'm sad to say that my school really didn't spend as much time on the American Civil Rights movement as it did on things British, so for me this was not only a very moving personal memoir, but also a ... Read full review

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