Marcus Aureliusa Rain Miracle and the Marcomannic Wars

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BRILL, 2009 - Literary Criticism - 301 pages
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The longest war of the Roman imperial period is the war Marcus Aurelius waged with the northern German and Sarmatian tribes. The best-known events of these wars were the lightning and rain miracles. Divine intervention saved the Roman troops who were surrounded by the Germans and suffering from a water shortage, by means of a lightning and rain miracle. Thunderbolts struck the enemy while the rain soothed the Romansa (TM) suffering. Several pagan and Christian versions of the miracle existed already in Antiquity. PA(c)ter KovAcs examines these events and their sources in detail. The most important source is the Column of Marcus Aurelius in Rome. The scenes of the column depict the miracles as well and therefore it was studied separately. The author also sketches the history of the Marcomannic wars. He publishes all the sources of the miracles and examines the development of the legend from Antiquity to the 14th century.
 

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Contents

Chapter One The rain miracle
1
Chapter Two Research history of the rain miracle
3
Chapter Three Sources for the rain miracle
23
Chapter Four The rain miracle in medieval Latin and Byzantine sources
95
Chapter Five Coins and the rain miracle
107
Chapter Six The forged letter attributed to Marcus Aurelius
113
Chapter Seven Julian Theurgistes and the rain miracle
123
Chapter Eight The lightning and rain miracles
137
Chapter Ten The scenes on the Column of Marcus Aurelius
169
Chapter Eleven MarcomannicQuadian assault on Italy
181
Chapter Twelve Pannonia and the Marcomannic wars
201
Chapter Thirteen The dating of the scenes on the Column of Marcus Aurelius
265
Bibliography
277
Index of Names
289
Index of Sources
295
Copyright

Chapter Nine The Column of Marcus Aurelius
155

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About the author (2009)

Péter Kovács, Ph.D. (1969) in Archaeology, University of Budapest, is associate professor at Pázmány Péter Catholic University. He has published extensively on history and epigraphy of Pannonia and sources of the province. He is the editor of the series Fontes Pannoniae Antiquae (I-IV (2003-2007)) and Tituli Romani in Hungaria reperti (Bonn 2005).