Mardi and a Voyage Thither

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Northwestern University Press, 1998 - Fiction - 681 pages
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Presented as narratives of his own South Sea experiences, Melville's first two books had roused incredulity in many readers. Their disbelief, he declared, had been "the main inducement" in altering his plan for his third book, Mardi: and a Voyage Thither (1849). Melville wanted to exploit the "rich poetical material" of Polynesia and also to escape feeling "irked, cramped, & fettered" by a narrative of facts. "I began to feel . . . a longing to plume my pinions for a flight," he told his English publisher.

Mardi began as a sequel to Typee (1846) and Omoo (1847), but changed radically while he was writing it and emerged as an altogether independent and original work. In its combination of adventure, allegorical romance, realistic portraits of characters and scenes from nature, philosophical speculation, and travelogue-satire, Mardi was Melville's first attempt to create a great work of fiction.

This edition of is an Approved Text of the Center for Editions of American Authors (Modern Language Association of America).
 

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Contents

A Calm
9
A Chat in the Clouds
16
Eight Bells
22
The Watery World is all before Them
29
Jarl afflicted with the Lockjaw
35
Chapter i4 Jarls Misgivings
43
Chapter i5 A Stitch in Time saves Nine
46
Chapter i6 They are Becalmed
48
A Book from the Chronicles of Mohi
219
Something more of the Prince
223
Advancing deeper into the Vale they encounter Donjalolo
225
Time and Temples
228
A pleasant Place for a Lounge
231
The House of the Afternoon
233
Babbalanja solus
236
The Center of many Circumferences
239

Chapter i7 In high Spirits they push on for the Terra Incognita
51
Chapter i8 My Lord Shark and his Pages
53
Chapter i9 Who goes there?
56
Noises and Portents
62
Chapter 2i Man ho
65
What befel the Brigantine at the Pearl Shell Islands
68
Sailing from the Island they pillage the Cabin
74
Dedicated to the College of Physicians and Surgeons
77
Peril a Peacemaker
80
Containing a Pennyweight of Philosophy
83
In which the past History of the Parki is concluded
85
Suspicions laid and something about the Calmuc
89
What they lighted upon in further searching the Craft and the
93
Hints for a full length of Samoa
98
I Rovings Alow and Aloft i00 Chapter 32 Xiphius Platypterus
103
Otard
106
Hon they steered on their Way i08 Chapter 35 Ah Annatoo
113
The Parki gives up the Ghost
116
Once more they take to the Chamois
119
The Sea on Fire
121
They fall in with Strangers
125
Sire and Sons
129
Chapter 4i A Fray
131
Remorse
134
The Tent entered
136
Away
139
Reminiscences
142
The Chamois uith a roving Commission i44 Chapter 47 YillahJarl and Samoa
146
Something under the Surface
148
Yillah
152
Yillah in Ardair
154
Chapter 5i The Dream begins to fade
158
World ho
160
The Chamois Ashore
163
A Centlemanfrom the Sun i65 Chapter 55 Tiffin in a Temple
168
King Media a Host
171
Taji takes Counsel with himself
174
Mardi by Night and Yillah by Day
178
Their Morning Meal
180
Belshazzar on the Bench
182
Chapter 6i An Incognito
186
Chapter 62 Taji retires from the World
188
Odo and its Lord
190
Yillah a Phantom
193
Taji makes three Acquaintances
196
With a fair Wind at Sunrise they sail
199
Little King Peepi
201
How Teeth were regarded in Valapee
205
The Company discourse and BraidBeard rehearses a Legend
208
The Minstrel leads off with a PaddleSong and a Message is 2i3 received from Abroad
213
Chapter 7i They land upon the Island ofjuam
216
Donjalolo in the Bosom of his Family
241
Chapter 8i Wherein Babbalanja relates the Adventure of one Karkeke in the
245
They visit the Tributary Islets
251
After Dinner
260
In a Calm Hautias Heralds approach
267
Chapter 9i Of King Uhia and his Subjects
275
Of that jolly old Lord Borabolla and that jolly Island of his
285
Samoa a Surgeon
294
Marnee Ora Ora Marnee
300
Chapter i0i The Iris
309
Chapter i04 Wherein Babbalanja broaches a diabolical Theory and in his
316
Chapter i05 Maramma
323
Chapter i07 They pass through the Woods
330
Chapter i08 Hivohitee MDCCCXLVIII
332
Chapter no They discourse of the Cods of Mardi and BraidBeard tells of 34 0
340
Chapter ii2 They meet the Pilgrims at the Temple ofOro
346
Chapter ii5 A Nurserytale of Babbalanjas
355
Chapter ii7 Babbalanja endeavors to explain the Mystery
362
Chapter i20 Media and Babbalanja discourse
369
Chapter i22 They visit an extraordinary old Antiquary
378
Chapter i24 Babbalanja quotes from an antique Pagan and earnestly presses
387
Chapter i26 Yoomy sings some odd Verses and Babbalanja quotes from the
393
Chapter i28 Their adventures upon landing at Pimminee
401
Chapter i30 A Receptionday at Pimminee
408
Chapter i32 Babbalanja regales the Company with some Sandwiches
414
Chapter i34 Behind and Before
422
Chapter i36 My Lord Media summons Mohi to the Stand 43i My Lord Media summons Mohi to the Stand
435
Chapter i4i Taji still hunted and beckoned
450
Chapter i45 Chiefly of King Bello
465
Chapter i48 Through Dominora they wander after Yillah
478
Chapter i52 They sail round an Island without landing and talk round
491
Chapter i56 The charming Yoomy sings
509
Chapter i6i They hearken unto a Voice from the Cods
523
Chapter i63 They converse of the Mollusca Kings Toadstools and other
536
Chapter i65 They round the stormy Cape of Capes
543
Chapter i67 They seek through the Isles of Palms and pass the Isles of Myrrh
549
Chapter i69 Sailing on
556
Chapter i7i They visit one Doxodox
562
Chapter i74 They land at Hooloomooloo
569
Chapter i76 Babbalanja starts to his Feet
579
Chapter i78 A Deathcloud sweeps by them as they sail
586
Chapter i8i They sup
603
Chapter i82 They embark
610
Chapter i85 LUltimasera
617
Chapter i87 They land
625
Chapter i88 Babbalanja relates to them a Vision
632
Chapter i90 They meet the Phantoms
640
Chapter i93 They enter the Bower of Hautia
651
Chapter i94 Taji with Hautia
658
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About the author (1998)

Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. He is best known for his novel Moby-Dick. His first three books gained much contemporary attention (the first, Typee, becoming a bestseller), and after a fast-blooming literary success in the late 1840s, his popularity declined precipitously in the mid-1850s and never recovered during his lifetime. When he died in 1891, he was almost completely forgotten. It was not until the "Melville Revival" in the early twentieth century that his work won recognition, especially Moby-Dick, which was hailed as one of the literary masterpieces of both American and world literature. He was the first writer to have his works collected and published by the Library of America.


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