Marie JaŽll: The Magic Touch, Piano Music by Mind Training

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Algora Publishing, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 224 pages
Admired by Liszt, Saint Sakns and Paul Valiry, Marie Jakll was at the center of a revolution in musical pedagogy. As a brilliant pianist, she was the first to interpret all of Liszt. At the apogee of her famous career, she quit concert performing and threw herself into mastering the piano in a scientific way by applying rigorous methodology. She reinvented herself as a scientist. What seemed before to be a matter of individual luck and "good days" in playing piano, she turned into a subject of formal mental training. She documented how one can draw forth crystalline sounds from the piano on a conscious basis. While talent remains a powerful ingredient in the art of music, it could now be enhanced by a as powerful methodology. Marie Jakll's analytical breakthroughs have helped pianists perfect their touch, drawing forth more beautiful musical sonority.
 

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More on Marie JaŽll and the author Catherine Guichard: http://www.marie-jaell.info/

Contents

MARIE JAELL AND HER CENTURY
13
MY ART IS A SCIENCE
24
FROM THE HEART LET IT SPEAK TO THE HEART
36
CAN A WOMAN CALLED TO CREATE BE A WIFE?
51
LISZTS SCHOOL
61
THE PIANO SAGA
71
THE PIANO A MARVEL OF MUSIC
86
THE HYPOSTASIS OF THE PIANO
106
BEFORE PLAYING THE MUSIC BE THE MUSIC
137
MY FINGERS TOUCH WHAT MY EYES SEE
161
THE PARADISE OF THE GOD INDRA
177
BRAHMAS COSMOS
185
THE DECLINING YEARS
203
EPILOGUE
211
BIBLIOGRAPHY
217
INDEX
223

THE TOUCH
123

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