Marion in the Golden Age

Front Cover
History Press, 2009 - History - 126 pages
In the late nineteenth century, America's new railroads flooded Marion with extravagant cargo: the rich and famous. For the likes of Mark Twain, Henry James and President Grover Cleveland, whose home here was known as the summer White House, Marion became a treasured sanctuary from city life. Teeming with prosperity and the blossoming arts, this hamlet offered a setting so breathtaking that it inspired some of the world's foremost creative minds. Encouraged by The Century Magazine editor Richard Watson Gilder, prominent artists, architects, writers and celebrities flocked to Marion. Also frequented by Academy Award winning actress Ethel Barrymore, it was here that Charles Dana Gibson sketched his iconic 'Gibson Girl.' Whether following First Lady Frances Cleveland's trendsetting fashion or the well-publicized wedding of Cecil Clark and Richard Harding Davis, the eyes of America were firmly planted on Marion's sparkling shores and glittering guests.

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Contents

Acknowledgements
9
Introduction
11
The Golden Age Begins
13
A Fitting and Delightful Environment
21
President Grover Clevelands Retreat
31
Artists in Marion
47
The Long Brown House and Other Architecture
65
Literary Leanings
77
The Stage Comes to Marion
99
Making Music
113
Marions Clergymen
119
Bibliography
125
About the Author
127
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Judith Westlund Rosbe, a resident of Marion for over two decades, is an avid historian dedicated to preserving the the history and buildings of Marion, which date back to 1690. In addition to her law practice, she has been an active member of the Sippican Historical Society for more than twenty years, serving as president for nine years. She also has taught as president for nine years. She also has taught English and history at high school and college levels, and she has used her teaching abilities and interests to assemble Marion, bringing the stories of the town's familiar landmarks to the reader.

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